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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Aug 2015


August 13, 2015

SEA Scientist Talks Marine Debris on NPR Station WCAI

SEA Semester

SEA Semester® in the News:

Dr. Kara Lavender Law was a guest on WCAI-FM’s award-winning public affairs show “The Point” on Thursday, Aug. 13, 2015. She discussed issues surrounding marine debris in the context of a new art exhibit on Cape Cod.

Listen to audio from Kara’s appearance.

Categories: News, • Topics: research  plastics  science • (0) CommentsPermalink

August 13, 2015

Summer SEA Semester Student Featured by Andover Newspaper

SEA Semester

SEA Semester® in the News:
“Adventure on the high seas”
by Shannon Flynn, The Andover Townsman | Aug. 13, 2015

Emily Callan, an Andover High School graduate, has served many positions aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans from assistant steward in the galley to helmsman. But her favorite, she says, is lookout.

“When you are on lookout, you stand at the bow with the winds in your face keeping an eye on the horizon for any signs of other ships or incoming squalls. Most of the time, you are the only one out there which makes it very peaceful,” she wrote in a blog post from July 14.

The 21-year old, University of South Carolina senior is aboard an eight-week voyage to the Phoenix Islands where she and 21 other students are studying the remote area of the Pacific Ocean.

Read the full story here.


August 13, 2015

The Music of SEA; On SSV Cramer, we call these “Tubas”

Tom Clark, W-26, Overseer

Corwith Cramer

SEA attracts all kinds of talented and creative people who delight in coming up with names for just about everything. The industrial stove is named “Roxy”, short for Roxanne.  The soon to be replaced hot water heater is named Lola, no one seems to know why. The sleeping quarters are named “Sleepy Hollow” , “Squalor” and “42nd Street”.  Why is ” 42nd St”? the name for a crew cabin on a ship at sea, thousands of miles from Broadway? Don’t tell me, let me guess.42’ N is the approximate Latitude of Home Base, Woods Hole, MA!

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: yard period  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

August 12, 2015

The Small Boat

Chris Nolan, Assistant Captain

Corwith Cramer

SS/V Corwith Cramer is equipped with a rigid hulled inflatable boat that we call the “rescue boat” because it is our first response craft if a person were to fall overboard.  However, it has many other uses - such as a ferry for bringing people ashore when Cramer is anchored out, and as a makeshift tugboat for difficult mooring situations.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: yard period  sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

August 12, 2015

The Strait of Gibraltar

Farley Miller, 3rd Assistant scientist

Corwith Cramer

The entrance to the Mediterranean Sea is one of the most interesting and dynamic areas in the world, speaking oceanographically. The mixing of two of the largest water bodies on Earth takes place in the Strait of Gibraltar, a mere eight miles across at its narrowest and 20 miles long. At the Western edge of the Strait, a fjord like barrier lies 80-190 or so meters beneath the surface, while only a few miles on either side, depths of over 800 meters are the norm.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: yard period  science • (0) CommentsPermalink

August 12, 2015

Denison University Spotlights Phoenix Islands Summer Voyage

SEA Semester

SEA Semester® in the News:
“Denison University Student Erica Schulz ‘17 Does Research with SEA Semester”
Denison University | Aug. 12, 2015

GRANVILLE, Ohio—Denison University student Erica Schulz ’17 is sailing with the SEA Semester program aboard one of the first scientific research voyages to the Phoenix Islands, a largely unexplored region of the Pacific Ocean. The biology major from Bloomfield Hills, Mich., is gathering data that has the potential to make real and lasting contributions to the limited knowledge about one of the last remaining coral wilderness areas on Earth.

Read the full story here.


August 12, 2015

Ahoy friends & family

Samantha Schildroth, University of New England

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Students aboard the Robert C. Seamans are currently busy finishing project work with the help of our dear friend caffeine. Amidst the “end of the semester frenzy,” we have reached the island of Tutuila, American Samoa, and are keeping a 3 nm mile distance off as we prepare to enter our final destination at Pago Pago Harbor in the coming days.


August 11, 2015

Science

Christina Quinn, Sewanee: The University of the South

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

We will be casting our last science deployment in the morning, American Samoa is just over the horizon, and we are looking out for shipping lanes. The end of the trip is drawing near, and it seems like it came slowly until it came all at once.


August 10, 2015

Liferafts

Chris Nolan, Assistant Captain

Corwith Cramer

While tied securely alongside the pier in Cadiz, Spain, we took the opportunity to send our liferafts off the ship for their annual inspection and servicing at a local USCG approved vendor.  Each raft holds 20 people, and with three of these rafts onboard, it provides plenty of excess capacity in case of emergency. This seems like common sense today, but it wasn’t always the case!

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: yard period • (0) CommentsPermalink

August 10, 2015

An Update from S-261

Jan Witting, Chief Scientist

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Dear Readers of our Blog,

First off, everything is well on board the ship.  The absence of entries in the past few days are the result of many competing deadlines as our voyage is starting to draw to a close.  Papers are due in just two day, student presentations will occur tomorrow and so the dedication to blog writing has taken a decided hit.  So let me recap the past few days.


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