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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Jul 2015


July 20, 2015

Welcome SEASCape session II

Maggie Cozens & Marine Lebrec, SEASCape II RAs

SEA Semester

Today was quite the eventful day for the 28 students that were welcomed to the SEA campus to begin the second SEASCape program of the summer (despite the brutal heat). During the next three weeks, these high school students will have the opportunity to make new friends and discover the world of Oceanography and Maritime History and Culture. Compared to the first session, this group has a bunch of students from far away, including Louisiana, California, Texas, Canada, and Switzerland!

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July 20, 2015

Land Ho!

Erica Lee Schulz, Denison University

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Dear Land Lovers,
It has been almost two weeks since we set sail from Honolulu. We have seen nothing but deep blue seas (day in and day out) and it has been marvelous. Our tans lines have become clearly defined and it seems as though we all have finally (got ahold of)(toned) our sea legs. The hectic watch schedule has started to become a routine and life on the Robert C. Seamans is becoming somewhat normal.


July 19, 2015

A Glimpse of Stars

Alex Leone, A Watch, Yale University

During the mid night watch, 2300 to 0300, A watch experienced our first glimpse of the stars. After about ten days of sailing and exploring, we had yet to see a single star on our night watches because the weather was consistently misty and overcast. While at the helm, focusing on keeping the Cramer on track by intently staring at the compass attempting to read the numbers through the collection of magnifying rain drops obscuring my view, I noticed a single bright light in the sky.


July 19, 2015

Faculty & Students, SEASCape II

The students of SEASCape II 2015 begin their program on Monday, July 20th. This three-week summer program at Sea Education Association offers motivated high school students the opportunity to study the marine environment from a variety of perspectives – scientific, historical, literary, and nautical. Participants live and study at our campus in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Academic programming is scheduled throughout each day, including on most weekend days. Coursework includes lectures, discussions, laboratory activities, and field trips; all introducing students to the study of oceanography, the history of humanity’s relationship with the oceans, and modern maritime issues. Teamwork, leadership, and sense of community are the underlying values of SEA’s academic curriculum. Participants not only grow as students, but as global citizens and individuals.

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July 19, 2015

Closer to Land

Stephen Moran, Boston College

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Anticipation is building here as we are told that after almost two full weeks at sea that we will finally be able to see land tomorrow assuming that all goes as planned.  Enderburry is the small island that we will be passing by in hopes of arriving in Kanton extremely soon. Just as we all were getting settled into our new routines of life at sea work has really picked up since we have entered PIPA really ramping up the amount of samples we take from the sea, not to mention our first paper being due in only a couple of days.


July 18, 2015

Heave, Ho! And Away we Go!

Isabella Martinez, A Watch, Brown University

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

Some numbers from Douarnenez:

1 haunted island (Isle de Tristan) that was once inhabited by…
1 old house once inhabited by a rich “Jay Gatsby” de Douarnenez and lavish parties
2+ number of Nazi bunkers
2 old sardine factories
(unknown number) of ghosts
4 operating sardine canneries out of 24 original factories
1 trip to the Mayor’s office for a wine and cheese reception in our honor


July 18, 2015

Entering the Phoenix Islands Protected Area

Maddie Beattie, Albion College

Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Late last night, at approximately 2300, we entered PIPA, and after sailing through PIPA for over twelve hours the ocean still looks pretty much the same as it has for the past week.  It looks so similar because PIPA is actually significantly larger that it appears on maps, and a majority of this area is open ocean.  Due to the Mercator effect, which is the warping of a sphere when applied to a flat surface – such as a map –, the areas near the pole appear larger in relation with the areas near the equator.


July 17, 2015

Saratoga newspaper profiles hometown SEA Semester student

SEA Semester

SEA Semester® in the News: “So Much To Sea: Freeman ’17 and Schuldt ’18 Embark on Tall Ship Adventures”
Norra Reyes, Saratoga TODAY | July 17, 2015

SARATOGA SPRINGS – Elizabeth “Liz” Olson, 19, returned home to Saratoga Springs earlier this month after a transformative experience sailing the high seas as part of a Marine Biodiversity and Conservation SEA semester through the Sea Education Association (SEA) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Read the full story here.


July 17, 2015

Looking for “Le Wifi”

Ali Glassie, Humanities TA

Historic Seaports of Western Europe

My quest for “le wifi” was unsuccessful yesterday. So much for my Skype date. It was probably for the better (sorry honey). Honestly, I love being able to talk to my loved ones for free over the internet during port calls. However, while prepping for a class on the backstory of the Beaufort Scale, which is an ordered set of descriptions mariners have used to determine wind force based on observed conditions since Darwin’s voyage on the HMS Beagle (I miss you, Wilbur and Freyja!), I ran across the following:


July 17, 2015

Siren Song

Christina Sun, Brown University ’14, University of Washington ‘17

I. Navigation
Course steered: 225˚with Toaea at the helm. He is I-Kiribati, an observer, mostly silent like Wind: Beaufort force 2. Not enough to make Speed: 7.5 knots against a countercurrent, so under the forestays’l and mainstays’l we again find ourselves Motorsailing across the Pacific. Position: 0˚58.150’S x 169˚42.0’W


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