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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Apr 2015


April 08, 2015

SUNY-ESF Student Recognized for SEA Semester voyage

SEA Semester® in the News: “ESF Student On Board for SEA Semester Oceans & Climate program”
SUNY-ESF Office of Communications | April 8, 2015

Nicole Harbordt, a junior at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF), is participating in SEA Semester’s Oceans & Climate program. Read the full story here.

Categories: News,Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258  new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 08, 2015

Calm seas, sunshine, and stars!

Sophie Davis, A Watch, Oberlin College

Oceans & Climate

The past two days have brought calm seas and clear skies, sunsets, sunrises, stars, Magellan clouds, star fixes, moonrises, climbs aloft, net tows, hydrocasts, ukulele and violin on deck, laundry, silly conversations, serious conversations, late-night paper writing, cloud gazing, far too many delicious snacks, lots of peanut butter, sextants and charts, scrubbing decks and deep cleans, gym workouts on the fore deck with the “celestial bodies,” laughter…

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258  sailing • (1) CommentsPermalink

April 08, 2015

Oceans & Climate student featured by Grinnell College

SEA Semester® in the News: “Conard Lee ‘16 spends spring semester at sea”
Grinnell College website | April 8, 2015

Grinnell College student Conard Lee, ’16 (Biology), is one of 24 undergraduates from top colleges and universities nationwide and abroad who are sailing the high seas this spring to tackle one of the most prominent scientific challenges of their generation: global climate change. Through SEA Semester: Oceans & Climate, a distinctive study abroad program offered by Sea Education Association (SEA), these students are carrying out independent research on climate interactions in a less-studied region of the remote Pacific Ocean—all from the deck of a tall ship sailing research vessel.

Read the full story here.

Categories: News,Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258 • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 07, 2015

Sunrise, Sunset, and Stars!

Matt Hemler, C Watch, Northeastern University

Oceans & Climate

One phenomenon of the rotational watch schedule is that on one day out of every three, you stand afternoon watch (1300-1900) and see the sun set, followed by dawn watch (0300-0700) where you get to enjoy the sunrise. It makes for a bizarre sleep schedule but on a clear night it is well worth it. Last night was one of the most incredible views of the sky I have ever seen.


April 06, 2015

Clouds

Nevin Schaeffer, A Watch, Whitman College

Oceans & Climate

Clouds. Amazing beings so frequently ignored at yet so powerful. They contain information on storm fronts, wind conditions and future weather trends, in addition to the visions of creative minds, rainbows and coloration of sunsets and sunrises. While on lookout I find myself continually distracted by clouds. The speed in which they move, the direction, their classification. I spend my hour on the bowsprit bouncing along in the waves projecting an image of a weather map in my mind from the conditions I am observing.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: None • (4) CommentsPermalink

April 05, 2015

It’s a Grand Old Time with the Moon

Tasha Greenwood, C Watch, Northeastern University

Oceans & Climate

For me, the best part of being at sea is always being in the middle of an ever-changing landscape. Some people have asked me if being at sea for weeks becomes monotonous. The answer is that that is impossible. Every minute, the ‘landscape’ we move through is shifting, both the sea and sky and conditions in between. Two nights ago, we witnessed a total lunar eclipse. I was not personally awake to see the event, but caught the tail end of the Earth’s shadow on the moon as we came up on deck for watch at 0245.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258 • (2) CommentsPermalink

April 04, 2015

Deep Clean

Conard Lee, C Watch, Grinnell College

Oceans & Climate

The past two days have been a simultaneously exciting and exhausting experience for me. Yesterday I faced my fear of heights and climbed up the foremast by way of the ratlines running up the mast. This experience was at once terrifying and exhilarating, a feeling which has often been described as the “sublime,” and I must say that sublime wasn’t one of the words in my head during that time. I would even go so far as to say that no real words were said in those minutes my feet were far above the deck.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258  sailing • (2) CommentsPermalink

April 03, 2015

Through Time and Space

Sara Martin, 3rd Mate, C Watch Deck Officer

Oceans & Climate

If you could have a day to repeat, a day to live through again, which day would you choose?  That question was posed to the students of S258 this afternoon by the Golden Dragon, the majestic guardian of the 180° meridian and the International Date Line.  As Arthur ably told you yesterday, time is both integral to the life of the ship and entirely arbitrary, and we all took this afternoon’s class as an opportunity to celebrate, be a little silly, and mark this unique experience of traveling back through time to live a day over again.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258 • (0) CommentsPermalink

April 03, 2015

Time: A Human Invention of Great Use at Sea

Arthur Davis, C Watch, Oberlin College

Oceans & Climate

Today marks the first 24 hour period that we will observe as the 3rd of April.  How is this possible? Tonight we will cross the International Date Line, which, unlike the equator, tropics, or ant/arctic circles, does not represent any change in natural phenomena. It is rather the other side of the prime meridian (itself an arbitrary line) that runs through Greenwich, England.  Although it is arbitrary, the Date Line is important because of our attention to time.


April 02, 2015

The First Sun

Ari Eriksson, A Watch, Syracuse University

Oceans & Climate

Today we were privy to the very first sunrise that April second would see. The International Dateline takes an easterly dip to avoid cutting the Chatham Islands off from mainland New Zealand time, putting it on the cutting edge of every new day. Anchored in Waitangi Bay this morning, the dawn watch’s numbers were nearly tripled as camera wielding sailors rushed the quarterdeck to bear witness to the first sun. I found a personal connection with this particular golden explosion of light.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: s258  science • (5) CommentsPermalink

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