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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Feb 2015


February 12, 2015

SEA Research Professor Co-Authors New Study in Science

SEA Semester

New study in Science calculates amount of plastic waste going into the ocean
8 million metric tons of plastic enter the oceans per year

Woods Hole, MA – Millions of tiny bits of plastic swirl around the ocean, carried far offshore by ocean currents and with few clues about their origin.  It has long been suspected that much of this plastic started out as trash on land, but exactly how much un-captured plastic waste is making its way from land to ocean has been a decades-long guessing game. Now, a team of researchers working at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS) at University of California, Santa Barbara, has put a number on the global problem.

Categories: News, • Topics: science  research  plastics • (1) CommentsPermalink

February 11, 2015

SEA Semester Alumni Recognized at Regional AFS Conference

SEA Semester

Congratulations to three SEA Semester alumni who recently received the 2015 Best Student Poster Award at the New York Chapter of the American Fisheries Society Conference in Lake Placid, New York!


February 11, 2015

Auckland, City of Volcanoes

Tyler Hampton, C Watch, University of New Hampshire

Today we were accompanied on our bus tour of Auckland by Joseph Fagan from the University of Auckland, who shared with us his knowledge about the local geology, geography, cultural sites, and tourism industry. Our first stop was at Mt. Eden, a volcanic cone (one of many) protruding from the surrounding city. After a short walk to the top we were gifted with a beautiful panoramic view of ocean, the harbor, buildings, and surrounding topography. Joe had plenty to add on the site’s history as a Maori fortified village and its role as a tourist attraction.


February 11, 2015

Bio Bay, Vieques

Richard King, Williams-Mystic

A watch has the deck now as the rest of the ship finishes up their science projects or catches a nap before this morning’s science “conference,” during which students will present and interpret the data we collected during our three primary stations during our voyage: one in deep water, one in slope water, and one in more shallow, coastal water. Rani Onyango (Williams) is at the wheel as I write, steering the ship. The other members of her watch, Aramis Sanchez (Williams), Kevin Ferreira (SUNY Maritime), Stella Klema (Smith), and Emily Volkmann (Smith) are up forward with the first mate and their assistant scientist striking, setting, and adjusting sails in order to alter course from sailing downwind, to a more westerly course that is closer to the wind.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: c256c  williams-mystic • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 10, 2015

SEA Semester Wins 2014 “Sea Education Program of the Year”

SEA Semester

At its annual conference last weekend in Philadelphia, Tall Ships America presented SEA with the prestigious award of 2014 Sea Education Program of the Year. This prize is “awarded to a program offered by a current member of Tall Ships America which has significantly contributed to the educational credibility of programs under sail.”


February 10, 2015

Exploring Auckland!

Natasha “Scoop” Kaufman, B Watch, Boston University

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

We awoke bright and early this morning to enjoy a delicious breakfast, courtesy of steward Lauren, before setting off on a walking tour of Auckland. Our tour, led by Mary, brought us to the neighboring Queens Wharf and over to the Wynyard Quarter. As we learned about Auckland’s different waterfront areas, many of our fellow students shared information they had learned in their studies for our “Maritime History and Culture” course. We also got a great perspective on the importance of the city’s commercial industries.


February 09, 2015

Approaching Sun Bay, Vieques

Catie Alves, Marine Science Teaching Assistant and Lab Manager with Williams-Mystic

Williams-Mystic

Our equipment aboard the Corwith Cramer constantly monitors sea water temperature, salinity,  surface currents, and depth, but the majority of our scientific sampling mission is over, now that we have been sailing for four nights and sampled the geology, physics, chemistry, and biology at three major “super” stations. The next stage is that we are divided into groups to analyze and interpret what we’ve found.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topics: c256c  williams-mystic • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 09, 2015

The Global Ocean, SEA Semester class S-257 begins!

Mary Malloy, Ph.D., Professor of Maritime Studies

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

When the students and faculty for this ​class was last assembled, we could see 18 inches of snow out the windows of our Woods Hole campus.  We have now traveled to the opposite side of the world and into summer in the southern hemisphere.  With such a long distance to travel, it is not too surprising that five students were delayed along the way, and we will not have our full company on board until tomorrow.  (We followed very different paths to get here; most travelled through Los Angeles or San Francisco, but some students booked their travel through Fiji, Hong Kong, Brisbane or Honolulu.)


February 08, 2015

Winter Weather Alert

We are monitoring the weather forecast for Sunday, February 8 through Tuesday, February 10. Based on current information, SEA will be open Monday, February 9 and will hold orientation for SEA Semester class S-258 Oceans & Climate as planned.

Categories: News, • Topics: None • (0) CommentsPermalink

February 08, 2015

The Global Ocean, S-257

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The students of S-257, The Global Ocean, will join the SSV Robert C. Seamans on February 9th in Auckland, New Zealand. They will end their voyage around March 19th in Christchurch, New Zealand.


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