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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Feb 2015


February 23, 2015

One Exciting Monday!

Molly Disbrow, A Watch, Ohio Wesleyan University

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Ahoy there parents and loved ones! Oh boy, I have an exciting day to tell all of you about!

As you might have read from Rob’s blog entry, the Corwith Cramer hit a couple of squalls yesterday evening. For our safety and “the sake of aiding the learning process,” Captain Sean decided to set anchor for the night in Brewers Bay.


February 23, 2015

Epic New Zealand

Janet Bering, 3rd Assistant Scientist

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Dear Mom,

Camp is great! Oops, I mean - SEA Semester is great! Over the two weeks since we joined the ship I have had so many amazing adventures, from climbing aloft into the rigging, learning to identify marine birds, furling the heads’ls on the bowsprit, deploying zooplankton nets to learn more about the critters, setting square s’ls, eating on gimbaled tables, going to a Maori marae. I can’t even describe how much I’ve learned and I can’t wait to tell you all about it when I’m back in the same hemisphere.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topics: None • (3) CommentsPermalink

February 23, 2015

Stonehill College Promotes New SEA Semester Affiliation

SEA Semester® in the News:
“SEA Semester Affiliation Puts Students at the Heart of Oceanographic Research Around the Globe”
Stonehill College website | Feb. 23, 2015

Alexis “Ali” Johnson ’16 will never forget the night she felt the sky and ocean were alive, at once, all around her.

It was around midnight, and her ship was cutting through the South Pacific off the coast of New Zealand.

“The sky was perfectly clear,” says the mathematics and environmental science double-major.

Read the full story.


February 22, 2015

Our First Day of Shipboard Science!

Rob Foley III, St. Michael's College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hey all you landlubbers out there trying to live vicariously through Cramer class 257’s blog posts, here’s a recap of what we did and where we went for February 22nd –our first full day at sea! The day began with the Cramer under way to the northeast of Puerto Rico as we worked to make our “easting” (movement to the east) towards St. Martin. Unfortunately, nothing ever goes perfectly as planned on the high seas, and the wind was out of the east, making it necessary to tack and try to work the ship against the wind and seas.


February 22, 2015

Phase Two: Shadowing

Kyle St. Pierre, A Watch, University of Rhode Island

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

A couple days ago began phase two of our three-phase process aboard the ship. Phase one was an instructional phase where everyone got the hang of things here on the ship. Phase two is where one person in each watch shadows our watch officer, either the assistant scientist in the lab, or the mate on deck. Then phase three is when we assume the role of a junior watch officer or a junior lab officer and we are in charge of the watch.


February 21, 2015

Training concludes, sails are set, as C257 begins our cruise track!!

Thomas Hiura, Carleton College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

We spent the bulk of this morning anchored in the bay off of Old San Juan. Getting to that spot from the dock involved some impressive maneuvering by our crew, led by Captain Sean Bercaw. Despite the fact that we were docked in something of a corner with the wind blowing towards the shore, Captain Sean guided us off the dock as if he had done it hundreds of times before (probably because he has).


February 21, 2015

Watch Games 2015: A Salty Showdown

Elizabeth Asch & Maravilla Clemens, A Watch, Union College & Colby College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

It is every sailor’s dream to be the winner of a line-identifying competition, in which we demonstrate that we have “learned the ropes.”  This phrase was coined by the sailors of old to describe the need to learn the name and function of every line on the ship.  However, it should be noted that we have no ropes on the ship, because once ropes have a purpose they are referred to as “lines.”  In this sacred game, the ceremonies begin with the students separating into their designated watch groups-A, B, and C.


February 20, 2015

Old San Juan Port Stop

Jeffrey M. Schell, Chief Scientist

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

As prudent mariners it is always important to look ahead and plan accordingly, but as an academic, I will take the time to also summarize what the students have been doing the last 24 hours.

After a busy day of travel and several hours of shipboard training, the students quickly retired to their bunks last night.  All reported having slept well in their new home and were ready for the day’s adventure to start at the leisurely hour of 0645.


February 20, 2015

Volcanic Islands, Smooth Sailing

Sarianna Kay Crook, C Watch, Sailing Intern and resident onboard Kiwi

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The first navigation stars now open their bright eyes. The fading embers in the sky die down and the ship is becoming quiet below deck. Students now dedicating time to study and sleep. The galley is getting a spruce up, as it does every night after a hard day of work. It needs it! In the good hands of the evening watch it will be shining again at 4:15 when the steward and student assistant get up to begin breakfast.


February 19, 2015

C257 Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean begins!!!!

Craig Marin, Maritime Studies Faculty

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

The students have all safely arrived onboard, and general ship orientation and safety instruction is well underway!  After a brief welcome by our captain Sean Bercaw and an explanation of the Sailing School Vessel (SSV) status of the Corwith Cramer, students were introduced to the professional crew and organized into their respective A, B, and C Watch groups. And so begins their acclimation to the culture, customs, and language onboard a scientific, sailing vessel that will continue for the next six weeks!


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