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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Dec 2014


December 03, 2014

The Wide Sargasso Sea

Ger Tysk, A Watch, Maritime Voyager

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

There is an ebb and flow to life at sea that creeps into your bones. Three weeks ago, many of us crowded onto the quarterdeck of the Corwith Cramer for the first time, having never set foot aboard a sailing ship before, much
less crossed the second largest body of water on Earth. Today, at the midway point of our voyage, we are much more than the varied crew of 29 who waved goodbye to Gran Canaria on November 15. When our voyage ends, we will become part of a very small group of people to have completed a tall ship trans-Atlantic voyage after the end of the age of sail.


December 03, 2014

New Zealand is exactly like Nebraska… right?

Anna Bute, A Watch, University of Washington

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

First, THANK YOU to all of the family and friends that are keeping up with us via our blog and supporting us from afar. I cannot believe how fortunate I am to be spending my 2nd to last quarter of college studying with SEA on a
tall ship… in New Zealand… learning sailing and science (and some engineering) from an amazingly dedicated crew alongside some remarkable peers. Incredible, right? Everyone should get the chance to do this sometime during their lifetime!


December 02, 2014

Abundance of Sargassum and Mahi Mahi

Jessica Donohue, Assistant Scientist, C-210 Alum

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Greetings from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge! Today has been a very eventful and exciting day onboard, a great day to write the blog. Morning watch began as a typical watch, getting equipment prepared for our morning science station, until we heard the call “Fish on”.  The science team headed aft to help Chief Mate Sarah pull in the fishing line while Farley helped bring the catch on deck.  It was a beautiful Mahi mahi, the largest one caught yet, 60 inches long and weighing 40 pounds!


December 02, 2014

It’s a nick-nack Patty Whack, give the frog a loan

Kendall Marie Reinhart, A Watch, Dartmouth College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

First things first: THANK YOU across the global ocean and back to all of you who made this once-in-a-lifetime voyage possible for us ! It has been an extraordinary adventure that we will never forget.

Hello Folks!

I am pleased to report that my shipmates and I have all mastered the salty sailor.


December 01, 2014

The Sargassum and the Sea

Zach Godfrey, B-watch, Rhodes College

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Today is an historic day for the Corwith Cramer crew because we had our first sighting of Sargassum! I was in the main salon drinking hot cocoa and catching up with two other shipmates when we heard excited exclamations from on deck. For a second we were confused, but then we heard a word ring clear: Sargassum sighted! I headed up the mid-ship ladder with my mug in hand to see if I could catch a glimpse of the algae that has eluded us for so long.


December 01, 2014

Joyeux Anniversaire To Me

Marine Lebrec, C Watch, University of Washington

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

We are all so excited to be back in the routine of being at sea, which means taking four naps per day, eating the best foods, and sailing around beautiful New Zealand. Although many of us are feeling seasick, I am impressed by how motivated we all are to work hard while on watch.

Today marks a pretty special day for me - I turn 21 today (although it is still November 30th back home).


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