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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Nov 2014


November 21, 2014

Moon walking in the North Atlantic Gyre

Winnie Davis, B Watch, Sewanee - The University of the South

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Greetings from the Atlantic Gyre! November 21 marks yet another bumpy day on the Corwith Cramer. Everyone appears to have adjusted to the background cacophony of dishes rolling back and forth in their shelves in the main salon and we are learning to walk with the movement of the ship’s rolling and pitching—the stance reminds me of moonwalking.

Early in the morning, on dawn watch, the deck crew spotted a pod of dolphins off the bow, playing in the waves and leaving trails of bioluminescence. Their bodies almost looked like ghosts gliding through the water.


November 21, 2014

Hot Gatorade

Nicholas Matesanz, C Watch, Grinnell College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello friends and family of the Seamans crew! I write this to you over a steaming cup of hot Gatorade. Hot Gatorade? Yes. Hot Gatorade. It’s only our fourth day at sea but I’ve already learned quite a few tips which promise to prove useful throughout life. One of these tips is that imbibing cold liquids will make the body sad. The other is that consuming electrolytes, suspiciously scoopable and powder-formed though they may be, will make the body happy. These two tips reside under the subheading of “general personal well-being,” which is where the Gatorade comes in. I picked this habit up, I kid you not, from the Captain himself. Thanks Cap.


November 20, 2014

Moving South

Eli Steiker-Ginzberg, B Watch, Oberlin College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The days are starting to fold into one another, almost like vacation but we are working harder than any vacation that I’ve ever been on. Today marks the day we round the northern most point of the North Island of New Zealand. This point is called Cape Reinga, known in the Maori language as Te Rerengawairua. I am not the only one aboard the ship to wonder if there is an appropriate tattoo that is coupled with this particular event in our maritime adventure (sorry Mom).


November 20, 2014

Squally Night!

Emma Hayward, A Watch, Eugene Lang College - the New School for Liberal Arts

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

I suppose it all started during yesterday’s class.  Despite a rolling ship, the increasing winds and wave height was not enough to keep us from learning.  Faculty, crew, and students alike converged on the quarterdeck to hear the day’s weather, navigation, and science reports. Mama Cramer was racing along at a speedy 9.3 knots, and Craig stood at the helm while Nick, one of our scientific voyagers, began to explain to us just what his research project has to do with our ship.


November 19, 2014

Teamwork

Jeffrey M. Schell, Chief Scientist

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Every day at sea is different than the next - not all that profound when you think on it, but already we find ourselves wondering - how are we going to top this day?  Did we already peak so early in the voyage?  Can it get any better?  Well, I suppose it doesn’t have to get better, it just surprises us in new and unexpected ways. and that is what we have for this Wednesday, the 19th of November. 

The day for me began at 0600 with a morning wake up - a call for breakfast and an off-hand comment that if I planned on taking my coffee up on deck to be sure and bring my foul weather jacket!


November 19, 2014

Birthday Bioluminescent Dolphins

Kate Morneault, B Watch, Stonehill College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello world and happy birthday Nick Matesanz!  It’s been a beautiful day at sea - sunny and blue skies with a nice breeze.  Today started with a wake-up call at 0230 since I had watch along with the rest of my group from 0300-0700.  During this shift I worked in the lab with Kella, Chris, and our watch officer, Julia.  There was a lot to learn as it was our first day in the lab.  We learned how to do the hourlies and process pH and microplastics.


November 18, 2014

Birthday at SEA!

Sarah Herard, Chief Mate, C-197 Alum

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Hello Friends and Family!
This is Sarah, Chief Mate of the Corwith Cramer. I’m writing after a fantastic birthday at sea. Below is a list of some amazing things that happened onboard today:

Fresh small, sweet strawberries at breakfast:
My favorite morning meal is breakfast sandwiches. I was so happy to sit down at the table this morning before watch to find a spread of fresh fixin’s for biscuit sandwiches. A platter of fresh fruit as a side included fresh berries and bananas provisioned in Las Palmas.


November 18, 2014

Best wishes from a SEA Semester alum

Katie George, SEA Semester alumna, c-243

SSV Corwith Cramer at dock

Dear Students,

You are about to embark on one of those crazy once-in-a-lifetime opportunities. But you know that. What you don’t know is that this experience will enthrall and exhaust you. There will be conflict and head-butting; this happens when you put people so close together. There will also be bonds forged that last years - maybe a full lifetime although I can’t say that yet as I’m still living.


November 18, 2014

So long, Auckland!

Heather Piekarz, A Watch, Hamilton College

The Global Ocean: New Zealand

After much anticipation, today we finally set sail from Auckland! The day started early, with an 0500 wake up to get going by 0600. Once we motored away from the dock, it was all hands on deck to raise a few sails and make use of this perfect sailing weather. The crew wasn’t kidding when they said the learning curve on board was steep. With all of our practice in port and doing it for real this morning, most everyone has gotten the hang of setting and striking sails. Now we just have to remember which one is which!


November 17, 2014

Greetings Wildlife Enthusiasts

Farley Miller, Able Bodied Ships' Carpenter (Sailing Intern)

Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

Our first full day on the water got off to one impressive start! Dawn greeted an eager morning shift B-Watch, and we offered our salute by raising more sail and shaking out the reef in the mains’l, edging out another precious few knots. Our local whaling historian, Ger Tysk, was chuffed (after being rudely pulled out of her bunk) at the sighting of a pair of sperm whales around 1030. They were identified by the low, forward raked spout.


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