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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Mar 2014


March 15, 2014

S251 Weblog 15 March 2014

Rachael Ashdown, C Watch, Sweet Briar College

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I once rode a mechanical bull at a county fair.  It took all of about three seconds for me to be thrown to the mat.  Today has been a similar experience, only imagine that you are strapped to that bull and cannot get off.  And you have to cook and clean while you ride.  The goal of today was to clean and have a fun farewell before departing for our shore component tomorrow.  That all got turned on its head when we started having 15 foot swells and waves crashing over the sides of the ship.


March 15, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 15 March 2014

Jenny Ray, Steward

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Greetings from the Galley! Team galley is the smallest team on the ship – just Becky “the brain” Slattery and myself, Jenny “J.Ray” or “Cricket” Ray. Together, with the help of Roxy (our temperamental diesel stove), Lola (the boiler), and many helpful students who stop by when they aren’t busy with other ship’s business, we make three meals and three snacks every day. A normal day begins at 0430 when we make breakfast, get a head start on the day’s snacks, and make other staples such as bread, yogurt, and granola. These tasks keep Becky and I busy through lunchtime, after which we break and have time to attend class and rest up before tackling dinner.

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March 14, 2014

S251 Weblog 14 March 2014

Jerusha Turner, B Watch, Whitworth University

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Ahoy there land-lubbers, from on-board the Robert C. Seamans! That is one of the last times I’ll be able to say that sentence, seeing as tomorrow is our last full day on the ship. It is strange to me that S251 is almost over, and I’m beginning to reflect on the last six weeks I’ve spent at sea.


March 14, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 14 March 2014

Max Acheson

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Only ten days remain. Not far off numerically, however the amount of work ahead is intimidating to say the least. To add to the academic stress aboard the Corwith Cramer, as Jade touched on in yesterday’s post, the third phase of our voyage is upon us. This means Junior Watch Officer rotations have begun. So far Kate and Jade have lead the way with fine performances to say the least. There has been a great deal of navigating and science today, and without the proper guidance from an expert leader, many of these procedures would not be completed precisely and in a timely fashion.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251 • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 13, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 13 March 2014

Jade Moret

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Hello lovely people! Today let’s talk about science. While in Bequia there were many wide eyed, coffee fueled students that stayed on board Cramer to work on their research data instead of laying on a Caribbean beach, or exploring the island (which we had done the previous two days). What nerds we are, “sailing for science.” I do believe we all had our fill of excel spread sheets and figures yesterday. Today we did a CTD deployment, which is used to measure salinity, temperature, and depth. We also deployed my favorite scientific device, the neuston net.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  science • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 13, 2014

S251 Weblog 13 March 2014

Evan Ridley, A Watch, University of Rhode Island

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For the first time in what seems like a very long time, the Robert C. Seamans is moving with alacrity while entirely under sail.  After days of wind that would simply not cooperate, we’ve finally been blessed with a strong Force 3 that has us zipping along.  Since leaving Hao, it has been a game of ping pong as our course steered bounces up and down in order to remain five nautical miles from the scattering of atolls that make up the Southwestern portion of the Tuamotu Archipelago.


March 12, 2014

S251 Weblog 12 March 2014

Aleja Ortiz, B Watch, Graduate Student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

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So last night, we finally deployed the 2-meter net! We have been deploying throughout the trip two different nets for collecting different types of plankton: the neuston net and the 1-meter net. The neuston net is towed at the surface for 30 minutes. The 1-meter net is towed at depth (typically around 150 m). Basically water and biota is funneled through the net and collected at the end of the net in a small bottle (think a Nalgene minus the top).


March 12, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 12 March 2014

Joe Messere, Chief Engineer

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Hey friends and family! We put to sea again from Bequia today after having a few days to enjoy one of my new favorite spots in the Caribbean. This place was wonderful and the thing that made it so enjoyable was the people. The first thing I saw when going ashore was a little boy named Chadwick who was fishing near the dingy dock… from the refrigerator he was paddling! Chadwick and his friends met us on the docks several times to hang out and dance.

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March 11, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 11 March 2014

Lenna Quackenbush

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Hello, to everyone living in the world outside the Corwith Cramer. Today was a perfect day spent in Bequia. All of the students left the boat at 0730 this morning. After a little bit of time using wifi and getting back in touch with the outside world we went to a local fruit market had fruit including soursap, star fruit, coconut, wax apple, mango and banana.  At 0900 we met Craig and Mr. Belmar for a tour of The Bequia Boat Museum and a chance to learn about Bequian history and culture.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  port stops  bequia. • (0) CommentsPermalink

March 11, 2014

S251 Weblog 11 March 2014

Shoshana Moriarty, B Watch, University of Massachusetts Amherst

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Four days away from Tahiti and the end of our sea component, I can’t help but think about how much we’ve experienced and accomplished over these past weeks. As each of our classes begin to wrap up, I can now see how together they’ve created a complete experience. Nautical science will be the first to end, as our deck practical and sheet anchors are due tomorrow.


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