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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: Feb 2014


February 23, 2014

S251 Weblog 23 February 2014

Patrick Nease, A Watch, University of Vermont

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Ahoy landlubbers, and greetings from the deck of the Bobby C!  We are now in the middle of royal blue waters nearly 3 nautical miles deep with 700 nautical miles to go to Mangareva.  We hope for smooth sailing ahead as this will be our longest open ocean transit yet for the next six days.  We hauled in our anchor last night and departed Fatu Hiva around 2000 (pronounced twenty-hundred, or 8PM). 


February 23, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 23 February 2014

Janet Bering, 3rd Assistant Scientist

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Good morning everyone! A watch was just stood down from a quiet dawn watch, followed by a quick breakfast and dawn clean-up. Dawn watch is from 0300 to 0700. It is generally a fairly calm watch,

because most of the rest of the ship is asleep and there are no science deployments. The watch on duty is therefore able to focus on running the ship and completing processing in the lab. In the lab this morning, we completed a 100 count of zooplankton from the midnight Neuston tow.

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February 22, 2014

S251 Weblog 22 February 2014

Dominique Bodoh, C Watch, Beloit College

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There are no words in existence that are beautiful enough to describe today. After waking up to softly-spoken words from my shipmate Midori and an interesting Polynesian-styled breakfast we embarked on another adventure into Fatu Hiva.

Last night we were invited to dinner by a local family consisting of two grandparents and their nine and a half year old granddaughter whose name is Naheia, pronounced Na-hey-a. She is something special.


February 22, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 22 February 2014

Max Acheson

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I cannot believe only a week has passed since I hopped aboard one of the largest sensory overloads in which I could ever conceive of, a new world of teak, lines, sails, and science, most of which was Greek to me prior to the commencement of this voyage aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer. Wake up calls pierced through odd hours of day and night, commands were given in a language that I could not yet comprehend, and many new faces revealed themselves upon arrival, extending two helping hands while seeking in return both our unwavering friendship and cooperation.

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February 21, 2014

S251 Weblog 21 February 2014

Taylor Hogan, B watch, Northeastern University

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I’m swinging in a hammock strung between the forestays’l traveler and the forward port shrouds, preparing to write about my day today, which was just as full of activities as every other day this month. Three days ago, a very old woman taught us about the relationship the ancient people of Nuku Hiva had with sex and sexuality. Two days ago, we were greeted in Tahuata with an enormous feast and beautiful music and dancing, and with a cake with a single candle, presented to us in the hope that the Robert C. Seamans will return to the island in one year’s time.


February 21, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 21 February 2014

Matthew Hurst

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Hello again from SSV Corwith Cramer,
Time passes strangely aboard the ship. Days start and end not with the rising and setting of the sun but a small voice in your ear letting you know that your watch is beginning. It adds an intensity to life not generally found on land. Where most would be planning meals and sitting down to an evening show; our delicious and most times complex meals are crafted seemingly out of thin air by the magic of the galley, and our evening show is watching the heavens rise and set allowing us to compute our position by shooting the stars.

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February 20, 2014

S251 Weblog 20 February 2014

Cole Trager, C Watch, Hamilton College

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After our first full day in Tahuata, we were able to visit the town of Vaitahu to experience the island’s rich local culture for ourselves last night. The locals had prepared a massive feast for us, including poisson cru, coconut bread, goat meat, and a variety of other Marquesan specialties. We also had the privilege of watching some school children from the town perform traditional cultural songs and dances and were even able to learn a couple of our own. For me, this was by the far the most immersive connection we have had the opportunity to make with another community and I will continue to cherish this meaningful experience in the future.


February 20, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 20 February 2014

Meryl Friets

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Greetings from the Corwith Cramer! It is safe to say that this past week as been a whirlwind of information! As one intern put it, “just think of throwing spaghetti against the wall, eventually some of it has to stick and pretty soon you will have a whole wall of spaghetti.” My spaghetti wall is overflowing! We have come to agree that there is a whole dictionary dedicated to sailing terms. Things like striking and the jib and preparing to gybe once seemed like a daunting task, but it is now second nature.

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February 19, 2014

S251 Weblog 20 February 2014

Evan Ridley, A Watch, University of Rhode Island

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On the night of the 18th, the Robert C. Seamans motored quietly into Vaitahu Bay besides the main village on the island of Tahuata.  Amid the inky darkness we could faintly see the outline of mountainous peaks looming above us.  The light of the next morning gave way to our sight of the landscape, rising well over 1,000 meters in some places with scatterings of palm trees, sandalwood and foraging goats.  With this new day we were greeted with a very hectic yet very exciting schedule. 


February 19, 2014

C251 Web Blog - 19 February 2014

Anne Schulberg, Carleton College

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I think the past 24 hours have adequately encapsulated the breadth of experiences on this trip thus far. Last night was characteristically gorgeous, with storm clouds illuminated by the sunset. Every day somebody proclaims to have seen the green flash, but I stare at that sun until the last sliver disappears and all I see is spots for a while, so I’‘m not quite buying it. The stars then spilt across the sky and mirrored the bioluminescence on the waves breaking beneath the bow. On lookout, this was a sight to behold and belittled all Minnesotan stargazing which I had regarded so highly.

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