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SEA Currents Blog

SEA Currents: The Global Ocean: New Zealand


October 16, 2016

Digitally Disconnected

Mike Rigney, Assistant Engineer

The Global Ocean: Europe

When I was 18, I received my first cell phone. It was a fairly basic flip phone, but it had the essentials - you could actually call someone (lame), or text them (cool), which meant mashing at least a thousand buttons to spell out one medium-sized and predominantly misspelled sentence. “C u l8er” became a perfectly acceptable thing to say, and every self respecting purveyor of the English language collectively threw up. These were dark days.


October 15, 2016

Farewell Tonga

Noah McCord, A Watch, University of Denver

SPICE

Today all aboard the Seamans ended their first trip to the Kingdom of Tonga as we cast off our dock lines and motored away from our wharf in Nuku’alofa at 12:25. Tonga has been good to us, and I think that all aboard left wishing we were rich in time here. Between Vava’u and Nuku’alofa, we enjoyed incredible natural sights and interactions with the Tongan people which ranged from the briefest of transactions to prolonged and repeated conversations, helping us to better understand this place we have been staying and the people for whom it is home.


October 15, 2016

A Ship Full of Crew

Tanner N. Tillotson, Chief Engineer

The Global Ocean: Europe

There’s nothing like a full ship.

Although, I suppose I should note that Corwith Cramer, currently, is not actually full - we have two unoccupied bunks in the main salon, two unoccupied bunks in “squalor”, two bunks soon-to-be-occupied by our scientific observers from the University of Lisbon, Portugal, and two fold-out bunks that we’re not currently using in “Jake’s corner”.

So I’ll rephrase.


October 14, 2016

A Pretty Unreal Day

Emma Newmann, B Watch, Colgate University

SPICE

It’s impossible to count how many times today my shipmates and I paused to look at each other in amazement and exclaim how unreal our life feels right now. My day began with a 0600-0700 dock watch, during which I woke up fellow ship mates, sipped on coffee and watched a beautiful sunrise over the harbor. Next up was a buttery crepe breakfast, complete with blueberry sauce and lemon slices for garnishing. Sound good yet?


October 14, 2016

Happy To Be Here

Colleen Brady, B watch, College of the Holy Cross

The Global Ocean: Europe

Well we made it – sort of. The boat remained in the water and the water remained out of the boat through a few days of rougher weather and waters. We woke up this morning to a sunny sky and water calm enough for science deployments in the Gulf of Cadiz! We will be officially docking in Cadiz at 1400-tomorrow afternoon. A palpable calm came over the boat as the realization set in that we will once again be on land (particularly among those who have been seasick).


October 13, 2016

Meanders in Nuku’alofa

Tarita Roy Choudhury, A Watch, Drexel University

SPICE

Today was our second day in Nuku’alofa and it started with a successful field day; not so much an entire day but more like three hours of intensely cleaning our lovely Mama Seamans and ridding her of any weird smells, fondly referred to as ‘mung’ among the ship’s crew. C watch got us all pumped and ready to clean by very creatively improvising words of popular songs to reflect our upcoming task. A personal favorite is “Everybody’s Mung-Fu Fighting!” It was a performance that I am very glad to have experienced.


October 13, 2016

Spain the Rock Johnson

Sarah Holter, B Watch, American University

The Global Ocean: Europe

(Actually, the British Autonomous Territory of Gibraltar)

As you may or may not have read, the weather has been a pretty steady form of spooky and today was no exception. My, and the rest of B Watches’, day began at 0030 when we were woken up for 0100 Dawn Watch. The entirety of our watch consisted of on and off rain and wind that drenched our banana suit foul weather gear and left all of us with just a single word to describe the feeling, damp.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,The Global Ocean: Europe, • Topics: c269  life at sea • (13) CommentsPermalink

October 12, 2016

Strugs n’ Snugs

Kiernan Black, C-watch, College of the Holy Cross

The Global Ocean: Europe

The day started unlike many days for a typical college student. Usually at around midnight, I would be scrambling to finish a paper I had a month to write, sipping on my fifth coffee of the day and probably dressed in all cotton. Instead, I was strapped into the wheel box of a 135-foot brigantine, doing my lookout duties and only seeing 14 foot swells coming at our bow, all while wearing quick dry and a big yellow duck suit. What would I rather be doing? Most definitely the latter.


October 12, 2016

Riddles in the Dark

Andrew Prunk, C Watch, Connecticut College

SPICE

I don’t care how snooty this is going to sound, but it’s never a bad day when the first two obstacles I have to overcome are the butter annoyingly sliding off my blueberry pancakes and squinting through the sunrise at the view of an island I’ve never seen before. This is SEA Semester’s first time voyaging to the Kingdom of Tonga, and one could truly feel the cumulative excitement in the air as all 37 of us prepared to explore a new place for the first time, together.


October 11, 2016

Charismatic Megafauna!

Kat So, Northeastern University

The Global Ocean: Europe

We are never at a shortage for excitement aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer. Last night, I fell asleep to the gentle rocking of the boat following the end of watch at 0100. I had nowhere to be until 1100 Mini Class and was looking forward to a restful sleep, something that is valued incredibly high here. Instead, I was unceremoniously tossed around my bunk in the foc’sle (the forward area below deck nearest the bow), to consciousness at 0700.


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