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SEA Currents: News


December 02, 2017

Oh, What a Day!

Corinna Anderson, Sailing Intern

The Global Ocean

When C-Watch took the deck at 0100 this morning, we were told to put on our foulies because it had been raining for quite some time. Although it was pouring down on us, we still had great visibility from the waxing gibbous moon above us. As the moon started to set and the sun started to rise, we were able to see the orange glow of the moon peak through the clouds. It was definitely a bright spot! As the sky got brighter, I noticed a double rainbow while at lookout.


December 01, 2017

Our Huge World

Alex Ahlquist, B-Watch, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Caribbean Reef Expedition

Man, the world is big! I’m on the Corwith Cramer right now in port at Union Island in the Tobago Cays, and it sure is beautiful here. It sure did take a lot of work though! Life as part of a crew on a boat is pretty difficult.

Each day is work and sleep in a never-ending cycle, and I have a feeling these next 22 days are either going to fly by, or be incredibly long. It sure is a different state of being going to sleep one day, and waking up on that same day, and then having even more work to do, but it’s a lot of fun!


December 01, 2017

Deep Waters and Shrinking Cups

Hannah-Marie Pearl Garcia, C Watch, Sewanee, University of the South

The Global Ocean

Hello from water world (term from Assistant scientist Steve, who’s constantly on lookout for land)!

There is still no land in sight today, and we have been enjoying easterly winds and sunny skies here in the Pacific the past few days. It’s finally starting to feel like summer here along the subtropical currents. C watch (my watch) had the deck today from 0700-1300. Every watch has begun Phase 2 of our learning and leadership here on the ship. This includes shadowing our watch officers, making the rotation schedules, and even calling hands to sails as we all begin to take on more responsibility during watch.


November 30, 2017

The Great Blue Yonder

Tiffany Wu , B Watch, Cornell University

Caribbean Reef Expedition

Less than a week has gone by since we first set foot on the ship, but as we glide (and roll and tumble) through the Caribbean, it sometimes already feels like multiple lifetimes. Time works differently at sea, especially when you’re on the Cramer, where our days are divided into 6-hour watch intervals as we assist with tasks like sail handling and steering or processing oceanographic data in our small but highly functional lab.


November 30, 2017

Almost summer

Maddy King, A Watch, Bowdoin College

The Global Ocean

Hello from the Pacific!

Today is another beautiful day on the Robert C. Seamans. It’s beginning to feel like summer here in the Southern Hemisphere and shorts and sandals are becoming more common than fleeces and hats. We have now passed the final islands in the Kermadec island chain and will be out of sight of land again for the next week and a half or so until we get to Napier.


November 29, 2017

The Voyages of the SSV Robert C. Seamans

Isaac Vandor, B Watch, Olin College of Engineering

The Global Ocean

Hello dear reader,

I wanted to take a moment as we transit south towards Napier, NZ and all of the fresh fruit, chocolates, and laundry our seagoing heart’s desire to discuss where we’ve been. In short, these are the (much abridged) voyages of the Robert C. Seamans and our encounter with the Raoulian peoples of Raoul Island in the Kermadecs Island chain.


November 29, 2017

Well Underway!

Liz Thompson, Rowan University

Caribbean Reef Expedition

Hello all yee blog readers!  We have officially crossed over into the Atlantic and let me tell you, it was quite significant.  So far our crew has done amazing work on learning to set sails, plot positions, deploy all the science equipment, practice rescue mission protocols and even learn to cook glorious meals for a ton of hungry hungry sailors.


November 28, 2017

Phase Change

Aubrey (Evening Primrose) Meunier, B Watch, College of the Atlantic

The Global Ocean

Dear blog reader,

Today marks the beginning of our first phase change. Prior to today, our watch officers and assistant scientists were responsible for ensuring sailing and science were happening according to plan. In phase 1 we proved ourselves capable of taking on the next big challenge. What will this challenge look like?


November 28, 2017

Caribbean Reef Expedition: Week 7 Ashore

SEA Semester

Cami Mirow from Mt. Holyoke College describes her week ashore in Grenada before boarding SSV Corwith Cramer.


November 28, 2017

Sea legs

Chris Nolan, Captain

Caribbean Reef Expedition

Well, our first 24 hours has gone quite well since leaving Grenada. So far we have conducted two science stations and sampled with our hydrocast, meter net and neuston nets. Additionally, we have used flow through sensors to get readings on all kinds of water properties as we sail northwest of Grenada.


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