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SSV Corwith Cramer Blog

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Oct

12

Cramer Yard

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Sep

29

Cramer Yard

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Greetings from Cramer yard in Rockland Maine.
It is hard to believe we have been here a month. The guys that work in the yard for Rockland Marine have all learned our names if not they have given us nicknames. The weather has gone from the warmth of the summer
to the cool morning air of fall. The leaves that were once green are now full of orange, yellow and red.  Wool hats are now part of the morning attire. This is the indicator to sailors that is it time to head south. The Cramer crew is working hard to get her ready for her trip south. Where has the time gone?

Things that were taken apart are starting to go back together again.
New rig wires were put aloft yesterday along with many of the running rigging blocks.
The “wet paint” signs can be found in a variety of places as more primer and topcoat is applied. The rule of thumb is to just assume that it is all wet and beware. Red, white, buff and grey. Beware.
All the gear that we fire lined off for yard is starting to come back aboard, inspected and stowed.
Surfaces cleaned.
The list goes on!!
All the work that has happened during Rockland Yard 2012 could not
happen without the crew. Thank you to all. Stay tuned for the yard shirt!!!

Capt Jen Haddock

Sep

19

Cramer Yard

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Week 3 of yard has been momentous as work goes forward on repairs and replacement of worn and tired parts and pieces of the Corwith Cramer.  Sandblasting below her waterline was completed last Thursday and a coat of epoxy primer was applied.  Sandblasting in CC’s forward sewage tank was completed on Monday and ultrasonic testing of hull, frame and bulkhead thickness moved forward.  On Tuesday afternoon an American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) Surveyor looked at areas of concern and laid out areas of steel in need of replacement.  This in addition to repairs he requested from Week 2 are ambitious, and much will need be done to complete all in a timely fashion.

Deck crew have been scrapping, chipping and sanding areas of the bulwarks where paint has let go and rust has appeared.  Blocks from running rigging were lowered, renewed and painted and the ship’s wheel and binnacle are receiving attention.  As part of our sequential replacement of ship’s rigging several shrouds have been lowered and laid out so that replacement cable can be cut.  Soon the newly cut pieces will have their terminal ends poured with epoxy and then all will be served with tarred seine twine before being reinstalled.  Belowdeck several carpentry projects are underway, and now several more will be started as steel replacement will require access to areas normally unseen.

Engineers have been busy addressing goals laid out by both short and long term repair and replacement goals while also meeting the requirements as defined by ABS.  A process which test the insulation value of coatings for literally thousands of wraps of copper wire on motors and generators was performed and all to satisfaction of the attending Surveyor.  Other actions were testing every electrical connection throughout the ship for cleanliness and contact.  Also the two emergency fire fighting and two bilge emptying pumps were disassembled for visual inspection.  Engineers were also busy modifying the ship’s primary and secondary small craft (i.e. rescue and station wagon) for new outboard engines.

Science staff have been working quietly in a small corner of the shipyard on projects that only they can decipher.  Any attempts to derive what that is can be fraught with danger and confusion as only those with advanced analytical skills can fully dissect their actions.  Magical potions are mixed and plans to capture denizens of the deep are hatched, and contraptions of both ingenious and oft times devious minds are exercised and made for yet another year at sea.

Sep

10

Cramer Yard

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Picture caption:
The 2012 Cramer Yard crew

Greetings from Down East,
The Corwith Cramer and crew wrapped up our busy summer by sailing North to Rockland Maine.  The Cramer spends a few weeks every year conducting maintenance that is otherwise very hard to work into her academic schedule throughout the year.  Upon arrival at the Rockland Marine Corporation the crew of professional and volunteer sailors swarmed over Cramer’s decks removing anything and everything that might be in the way of sandblasting, rust busting or painting.  Protective sheets of plywood were laid down upon her teak decks, blue plastic over the freshly cleaned sole down below in preparation of the work to be done.  The transition of the ship from “home” to work site is abrupt and drastic for those who haven’t experienced it before but the condition of the Corwith Cramer after the work is complete extremely gratifying.  There are many projects on the list this year, from replacing some of the steel wire shrouds to a complete inventory of every single piece of scientific gear aboard to a complete paint job from the keel up to the cap rail.  The crew has moved off the ship and the work day lasts from just about sunrise to sunset.  Cramer now sits with her keel about 3’ above sea level on a marine railway, towering above the town of Rockland.  We will keep everyone posted on our progress during the next month, as always thanks for checking in on us.

On behalf of the yard crew,
Tom “Sully” Sullivan