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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: sailing


Aug

06

Counting Down

Ian Kasaitis, A Watch, McDaniel College
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

The countdown has already begun: “Five days,” everyone says. Still, reality has not yet set in that we will go our separate ways. Even with this realization, everyone is still upbeat: I hear the laughter when I wake up, I see the smiles at the lunch table, I feel the love of my watch, and I see everyone hard set on getting work done.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jul

18

I’M ALIVE, MOM!

Devin Kuhn, C Watch, American University
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

It has officially been a week since we set sail from American Samoa! C watch was the first standing watch to sail the SSV Robert C. Seamans. The first night was rough as most of my watch got sea sick (I still haven’t gotten sea sick), so there was a lot to do for a small amount of people. Fast forward to a few days ago, my watch was back on their feet and feeling great! All of us have experienced the wonders of the lab and how to use all the equipment, which process the samples we take out of the water.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (6) CommentsPermalink

Jul

16

Are You a 10?

Maddi Boettner, B-Watch, Boston College
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Hello from the lifeboat! Obviously kidding, there are no computers on a life boat. In all seriousness, we are still aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans, and we are all safe. On the starboard side (right) there is the ocean and, I bet you can guess, on the port side (left) is also the ocean. We are still sailing north in the EEZ of Kiribati, and we have set the two square sails rendering us a more refined version of The Black Pearl. In two days we will hopefully be in the presence of land.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (1) CommentsPermalink

Jul

15

Looking Inward

William Moreno, A Watch, University of Richmond
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

According to Captain Nolan, every sea-story should begin with “There I was….”

There I was…standing on the starboard edge of the quarterdeck, I was overtaken by a surging feeling of immense smallness looking out at the ocean at night, surrounded on all sides by the huge expanse of the central Pacific with a magnificent tapestry of stars.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (1) CommentsPermalink

Jul

14

Hold ‘Em & Fold ‘Em

Mark “Snark” Waddington, B-watch, Second Mate
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

A very wise friend once gave me this advice (I think we were talking about chairs):  “You’ve got to know when to hold them, know when to fold them. Know when to walk away, and know when to run.” He was trying to wax philosophically about how chairs were like life in general. Now it’s my turn.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (1) CommentsPermalink

Jul

13

We Are Alone

Amelia McCarthy, A Watch, Bryn Mawr College
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

We have now sailed for more than 24 hours under sail and wind alone, without the engine which, as one of my shipmates rejoiced means no more half-hour engine checks; we were even able to set the tops’l for a time.  More sails will have to wait for a change in course or wind, no matter how eagerly we await more sails.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (4) CommentsPermalink

Jul

12

Life at Sea

Richard King, Visiting Faculty, SEA
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

You’ll have to pardon the quality of the photograph, but I wanted to post it because it says a great deal about our voyage so far and what’s to come. We are now about 350 nm north of American Samoa and sailing to the east of the islands of Tokelau en route to the Phoenix Islands.

That’s Ian Kasaitis at the helm in the photograph. He is a biology major from McDaniel University. I took the photograph at a little after six this morning.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (4) CommentsPermalink

Jul

10

S-274 Gets Underway

Cheryl Bube, Lab Hand
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

It has been an eventful first day here on the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Morning activities for student participants were filled with an enlightening and refreshing walking tour to the Tauese P.F. Sunia Ocean Center in Pago Pago, American Samoa. During our visit, our crew had the unique opportunity to speak personally with Fisheries Observer and Biologist, Michael Marsik, from NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. Tuna canneries on the island of Tutuila provide many jobs for American Samoans, so it was invaluable that Marsik could provide us with excellent background information on local tuna fishing methods and regulations.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: sailing • (3) CommentsPermalink

May

03

A Day with Mama Cramer

Vanessa Van Deusen, B Watch, Barnard College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

0000 May 3rd 2017 — My watch beeps. It is midnight. I have been standing as lookout at the bow for one hour now. I look down into the water that breaks beneath me. It is speckled with bioluminescence that glimmers like sparks deflecting off of the hull. I look up into the sky, a bright crescent moon rests above me. I realize how thankful I am to be on watch on such a beautiful night.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: sailing • (1) CommentsPermalink

Apr

27

Sweet Life on Deck

Karrin Leazer, B Watch, University of Washington
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Hello everyone!

We have officially left the coastal waters of the Bahamas, and have entered the high seas, en route to Bermuda.  Today was another eventful day onboard the Cramer; standing watch, collecting samples, conducting genetic extractions/analyses, and setting sails.  During the allocated “class time,” the crew divided into watch teams (A, B, and C) and set all nine of the Cramer’s sails.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: sailing • (3) CommentsPermalink
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