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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: s264


Mar

25

A Toast to Tangaroa (aka Neptune)

Alex Salesin, C-Watch, University of Virginia
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

As our time on the Seamans draws to a close, I think most of us are wishing we could tie ourselves to the ship with our well-practiced knot knowledge and never leave. After our swizzle tonight, which will consist of lighthearted talents and debauchery no doubt, we will go our separate ways.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

24

Engineering Blog!

Tom Klodenski, Chief Engineer
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

This blog entry is the second of a two-part series of profiles on persons aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Chief Engineer Tom Klodenski and sign language interpreter Drew Pidkameny, both hesitant to write about themselves on the SEA blog, were nevertheless encouraged to contribute by resident anthropologist and blog czar Jeff Wescott. Tom wrote a series of questions for Drew to answer, and vice-versa. The entries for March 19 and March 24 are the result.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

23

Until We Meet Again (Probably in Minnesota)

Makenzie Michel, C-Watch, Union College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Dear diary/internet,

We had a surprisingly great day weather-wise today! At approximately 0200 we got word of a minor storm coming our way. Though the wind speed increased and the sky filled with clouds, the rain luckily held off. The plan as of yet is to stay close to the coast to protect us from the poor weather. We had an exciting surprise fire drill before lunch, giving us all a chance to practice our fire-fighting protocol, maybe for the last time onboard the Seamans.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

22

Where are we?

Jenna Lilly, A Watch, Colgate University
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Kia ora family and friends of all us salty sailors on the Bobby C!

After standing in awe of the sunrise over the Otago Peninsula this morning, we departed Dunedin and made our way through the narrow channel back out into the South Pacific Ocean, and on our way to Lyttleton. As a student of nautical science and geography, I am always interested in the numerous charts that aid us in our travels through bays and sounds and in the vast ocean around New Zealand.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

21

Seals, Penguins, and Little Critters!

Maggie Smith, A Watch, Kenyon College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

It is just our second full day in Dunedin, but I have already developed a new love for this city! We keep getting reminded by the locals that the weather is normally not 75 degrees and sunny and that we are just getting lucky, but it seems pretty perfect to me. We’ve had a very busy past 24 hours that have been full of visitors on the ship, an extensive all-day field trip, and storytelling from members of the Sense of Place class on deck.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

20

Sleeping In

Stacie Bellairs, B Watch, Whitman College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Today was the first day we have gotten to “sleep in” since February 17th. Never before would I have called “sleeping in” until 0750 actually sleeping in—but either way, it felt luxurious. Even with our extra hour of sleep, our morning was not off to a slow start. We enjoyed the company of a breakfast guest, Kim Curry. As we ate a delicious breakfast of frittata and homemade English muffins, we talked with Kim, an ocean chemist at NIWA at the University of Otago.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

19

A Conversation at Sea

Drew Pidkameny, Sign Language Interpreter
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

This blog entry is the first of a two-part series of profiles on persons aboard the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Chief Engineer Tom Klodenski and sign language interpreter Drew Pidkameny, both hesitant to write about themselves on the SEA blog, were nevertheless encouraged to contribute by resident anthropologist and blog czar Jeff Wescott. Tom wrote a series of questions for Drew to answer, and vice-versa. The entries for March 19 and March 24 are the result.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

18

A Very Charismatic Cephalopod

Rachel Soudakoff, A Watch, Rochester Institute of Technology
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

If someone told me 10 years ago, “You’ll be spending your 20th birthday in the middle of the South Pacific,” ten-year old me would’ve stared at them in bewilderment.

1. In the middle of the ocean?!
2. That sounds too good to be true
3. I’m going to be twenty years old?

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

17

A Day in the Lab

Gabriela (Gabi) Chávez, 3rd Scientist
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Late this morning, the sun came out after a long hiatus. For the past few days, only the watch on duty has been out on deck—everyone else has been holing up in the library, or the saloon, or their bunks. But today, the quarterdeck was suddenly peopled with B-watchers, C-Watchers, and Others in addition to A-Watch who were in the middle of a full science station.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

16

TIM TAMS!

Madison Atterbury, A Watch, Hamilton College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Good Evening World!

The SSV Robert C. Seamans had quite the day out here in the Pacific Ocean, east of the South Island and near the Chatham Rise!

A Watch had afternoon watch today—which means a great morning of sleeping in and a mini-class with Jeff and Elliot at 1100, where we talked about what else is going to happen in our short 1.5 weeks remaining on the ship.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s264 • (1) CommentsPermalink
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