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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: s258


Apr

13

Up in the Rigging and Down in the Lab

Tim Bateman, B Watch, University of Connecticut, Avery Point
Oceans & Climate

When I applied for SEA Semester back in early 2014 I knew that I was signing up for a semester unlike most study abroad programs. What I did not expect was to have my entire world turned upside down by a plethora of new and exciting experiences. Even with a hundred more blog posts I do not think that we could tell you all of the amazing things that we have been able to try for the first time, so I will just tell you about a few that were perhaps unique to me.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (3) CommentsPermalink

Apr

12

Life at Sea is Tough and I Miss You

Bruna Moscol, A Watch, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Oceans & Climate

Wow, life at sea can be rough. Rough, rough, rough. To begin with, the days at sea go by slowly, to the point where I almost wouldn’t be surprised if when we land in Tahiti in May 1st, we’ll be informed that actually 50 years have passed like in Interstellar instead of 6 weeks. It feels like I’ve been on the water for years. This is for many reasons but mainly due to the fact that on shore, you go to sleep, wake up, and then it’s already the next day.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

11

Sobre el atardecer y las velas

Santiago Botia B, B Watch, Universidad de los Andes
Oceans & Climate

I will start apologizing with almost everyone who is reading this blog, but tonight I am too tired to write in English. Y para los que entienden espanol, me disculpo porque las siguientes lineas no tendran tildes ni tampoco enes; podran tambien carecer de coherencia debido al mismo motivo. Hoy hace 17 dias nos embarcamos en el Robert C. Seamans con el firme proposito de recorrer mas de 3000 millas nauticas para llegar a la Polinesia Francesa.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (12) CommentsPermalink

Apr

10

Community and Reflection

Ariana Sharma, A Watch, Vassar College
Oceans & Climate

During the shore component, our little group of 24 quickly became a close-knit community. We were advised to avoid cliques and strive to include everyone, and we took that advice to heart. When we arrived onboard, I expected the close quarters to put a strain on our group dynamics. Since we are only 135 feet away from each other at all times wouldn’t we get tired of each other? But as the weeks progress I’m finding the opposite becoming a problem.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

08

SUNY-ESF Student Recognized for SEA Semester voyage

SEA Semester® in the News: “ESF Student On Board for SEA Semester Oceans & Climate program”
SUNY-ESF Office of Communications | April 8, 2015

Nicole Harbordt, a junior at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF), is participating in SEA Semester’s Oceans & Climate program. Read the full story here.

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Apr

08

Calm seas, sunshine, and stars!

Sophie Davis, A Watch, Oberlin College
Oceans & Climate

The past two days have brought calm seas and clear skies, sunsets, sunrises, stars, Magellan clouds, star fixes, moonrises, climbs aloft, net tows, hydrocasts, ukulele and violin on deck, laundry, silly conversations, serious conversations, late-night paper writing, cloud gazing, far too many delicious snacks, lots of peanut butter, sextants and charts, scrubbing decks and deep cleans, gym workouts on the fore deck with the “celestial bodies,” laughter…

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Apr

08

Oceans & Climate student featured by Grinnell College

SEA Semester® in the News: “Conard Lee ‘16 spends spring semester at sea”
Grinnell College website | April 8, 2015

Grinnell College student Conard Lee, ’16 (Biology), is one of 24 undergraduates from top colleges and universities nationwide and abroad who are sailing the high seas this spring to tackle one of the most prominent scientific challenges of their generation: global climate change. Through SEA Semester: Oceans & Climate, a distinctive study abroad program offered by Sea Education Association (SEA), these students are carrying out independent research on climate interactions in a less-studied region of the remote Pacific Ocean—all from the deck of a tall ship sailing research vessel.

Read the full story here.

Categories: News,Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

07

Sunrise, Sunset, and Stars!

Matt Hemler, C Watch, Northeastern University
Oceans & Climate

One phenomenon of the rotational watch schedule is that on one day out of every three, you stand afternoon watch (1300-1900) and see the sun set, followed by dawn watch (0300-0700) where you get to enjoy the sunrise. It makes for a bizarre sleep schedule but on a clear night it is well worth it. Last night was one of the most incredible views of the sky I have ever seen.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

05

It’s a Grand Old Time with the Moon

Tasha Greenwood, C Watch, Northeastern University
Oceans & Climate

For me, the best part of being at sea is always being in the middle of an ever-changing landscape. Some people have asked me if being at sea for weeks becomes monotonous. The answer is that that is impossible. Every minute, the ‘landscape’ we move through is shifting, both the sea and sky and conditions in between. Two nights ago, we witnessed a total lunar eclipse. I was not personally awake to see the event, but caught the tail end of the Earth’s shadow on the moon as we came up on deck for watch at 0245.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

04

Deep Clean

Conard Lee, C Watch, Grinnell College
Oceans & Climate

The past two days have been a simultaneously exciting and exhausting experience for me. Yesterday I faced my fear of heights and climbed up the foremast by way of the ratlines running up the mast. This experience was at once terrifying and exhilarating, a feeling which has often been described as the “sublime,” and I must say that sublime wasn’t one of the words in my head during that time. I would even go so far as to say that no real words were said in those minutes my feet were far above the deck.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: s258 • (2) CommentsPermalink
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