• Like Sea Education Association on Facebook
  • Follow Sea Education Association on Twitter
  • Follow SEA Semester on Instagram
  • Watch Sea Education Association on YouTube
  • Read SEA Currents
  • Listen to SEA Stories
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: s257


Mar

09

Back at Sea

Jenny Jones, C Watch, Middlebury College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Today was our first full day at sea in a week and, as is to be expected, much of our ship’s company is still in the midst of an adjustment period. We have had to contend with the familiar obstacles of life at sea, including hallways, tables, and showers that unexpectedly turn sideways, not to mention the associated queasiness alluded to by Sara in yesterday’s post. In some ways, getting underway feels like a return to our old routine, but a lot is changing.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Mar

08

Mal de Mer

Sara Martin, Third Mate & Med Officer, currently of A Watch
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

After a marvelous and much extended visit to Windy Wellington, the crew of S-257 headed back out to sea early this afternoon, equal parts excited to be getting underway and nervous about the challenges of the upcoming leg.

While everyone seems to have enjoyed themselves immensely in Wellington-exploring the city, running and hiking on the extensive local trails, getting fabulous tours of both Te Papa and Kaitoke park, and accomplishing an impressive amount of academic-project and ship’s work-the return to sea offers a retreat from the particular demands of the land.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

07

YOU SHALL NOT PASS. Out of Wellington So Covered in Mung!

Claudia Geib, A Watch, Northeastern University
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Good evening from a damp night here on the other side of the world! The full moon moon is shining, the wind is blowing, and Mama Seamans is clean-after a day of preparation, she and her crew are ready for our departure from Wellington tomorrow afternoon and the continuation of our adventure.

A watch started this morning with sponges in hand, performing the daily ritual of DC, or dawn cleaning.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Mar

06

Delayed in Windy Wellington

Eleah Wilkerson, B watch, Amherst College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Hello! Well, Wellington is still windy, and we are still here to be blown away. Those 45 knot winds promised in yesterday’s post came howling in this morning, and though it would be nice to be sailing today as planned, it’s probably good that we are staying in port until this weather blows over. I started the morning on watch at 0600 and in time to watch a spectacular sunrise before the sky clouded over.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (3) CommentsPermalink

Mar

05

Te Papa, the National Museum of New Zealand

Maravilla Clemens, A Watch, Colby College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Greetings from Windy Wellington! And it appears that it really will live up to its name—with up to 45-knot winds forecasted in the upcoming days, it is unlikely that we will be leaving our port until Sunday. While we are disappointed that we will have to wait a few extra days until we can have the wind in our sails again, it is pretty hard to complain at the moment. I am writing this from the top of the doghouse, basking in the sun while others lounge and read and our vagabond visitor Anthony strums on the guitar.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (4) CommentsPermalink

Mar

04

Land-Lubbing

Emma Colman, B Watch, Knox College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

I don’t write to you from the desktop computer of the ship. I simply couldn’t, it didn’t feel right. No, I am scribbling this down along the shore of Wellington’s Harbor- Where the tide is coming in and people are strolling by. It is a lovely night and was an impeccable day. We rose in the early hours of the morning (as per usual) then packed our bags for a forest adventure. Amongst our countless blessings, we are fortunate enough to have onboard two people doing a project that led us to Kiatoke National Forest.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (5) CommentsPermalink

Mar

03

Exploring Wellington

Chris Dalldorf, C Watch, Dartmouth College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Happy Chreaster Y’all, I’m turning 7!
I’m sorry if this holiday does not mean anything to you, but it means something to my friends, me, and my family.  It’s a long story that starts with my heart attack in 8th grade and me saying “Not today, Death!” (according to my longtime friend Edward, although I think he might be exaggerating) and ends with me celebrating it as my “other birthday” each year.  It’s a positive day, don’t worry.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Mar

02

A sunny and windy day in Wellington

Megan Goodman, B Watch, University of San Diego
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

My morning started out with a different sort of wake up than I’ve had on the ship. To a groggy and blurry eyed me, Sienna and Charlotte sang “Happy Birthday” with their lovely voices. Although startling, it was a pleasant surprise. To continue my birthday celebrations, Elliot gave me a gift in the form of a deck practical exam. While it was probably not the best present I have ever gotten, it was fun to see what we’ve learned these past couple of weeks. We were tested on things like line handling, tying knots, points of sail, and the crowd favorite, putting on an immersion suit.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

01

The Scholar Ship

Mary Malloy, Ph.D., Professor of Maritime Studies
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

As the historian on board, I’d like to take a few paragraphs and put our voyage into a broader context, as we sail in the wake of some really interesting mariners, beginning with the Polynesians who crossed the Pacific in double-hulled voyaging canoes and arrived in New Zealand around 800 years ago. What the Maori found here was very different from what they left behind on tropical islands like Tahiti, as New Zealand has a temperate climate.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Feb

28

Halfway Point

Eric Nord, B Watch, Umass-Amherst
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Greetings friends and family from warm, sunny Port Underwood! After nearly two weeks on the high seas we made anchorage early this morning on the tip of the Southern Island. Being able to walk from one end of the ship to the other in a straight line was a nice change and gave those of us with weaker sea legs a brief respite from the rolling swells of the previous days. We plan on setting sail for Wellington tomorrow morning and we all look forward to some time on dry land.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s257 • (1) CommentsPermalink
Page 2 of 4 pages  < 1 2 3 4 >