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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: s256


Dec

02

It’s a nick-nack Patty Whack, give the frog a loan

Kendall Marie Reinhart, A Watch, Dartmouth College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

First things first: THANK YOU across the global ocean and back to all of you who made this once-in-a-lifetime voyage possible for us ! It has been an extraordinary adventure that we will never forget.

Hello Folks!

I am pleased to report that my shipmates and I have all mastered the salty sailor.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (7) CommentsPermalink

Dec

01

Joyeux Anniversaire To Me

Marine Lebrec, C Watch, University of Washington
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

We are all so excited to be back in the routine of being at sea, which means taking four naps per day, eating the best foods, and sailing around beautiful New Zealand. Although many of us are feeling seasick, I am impressed by how motivated we all are to work hard while on watch.

Today marks a pretty special day for me - I turn 21 today (although it is still November 30th back home).

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Nov

30

Get yer sea legs on!

Kate Perkins, B Watch, Washington State University
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Today began with the excitement of heading back out to the open ocean! We enjoyed a regular night of sleep last evening, a precursor to the sometimes odd hours of the watch schedule we enjoy at sea. After breakfast, we completed the usual morning duties (cleaning, cleaning, and cleaning), then heard the call of, “all hands muster on the quarterdeck!” This call may indicate several things: meeting, class, field trip, or in this case, imminent departure.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (4) CommentsPermalink

Nov

29

You Can’t Beat a Good Day in Wellington

Sarianna Crook, Local Kiwi translator, Auckland Sailing Intern
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Locals joke “You can’t beat Wellington on a nice day!”

It’s truly a beautiful and fun place on such a day… you just rarely get a “nice day” in Wellington. Lucky for us, today was just such a day! On the agenda today for crew: prepare the ship for public viewing onboard in the afternoon; for students: work on the ever-present assignments, soak up some sun, and visit the national museum of New Zealand known as Te Papa.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Nov

28

Who knew laundry could be such good exercise?

Kate Hruby, C Watch, University of New England
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Today began differently for the SEA student by the name of Kate Hruby. Instead of waking up, questioning the port agenda for the day, enjoying breakfast,  cleaning the ship, and then heading to town like the rest of the students, she oh-so-bravely decided to take on not only the hose, bucket, and soap… but also the most feared nemesis of them all: dirty laundry.

Pre-breakfast, I waddled up on deck with the enemy at arm’s length. I made it through the first battles of socks and t-shirts with almost no problems, even stopping mid bacteria-wounding to wield the “ship, shipmate, self” mantra and do a deck wash.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Nov

27

Turkey Day in Kiwi Land

Sam Gartzman, A Watch, Beloit College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Happy Thanksgiving from the Robert C. Seamans!

Today was a very busy day for the students of S256. We started the day with breakfast on the ship. We had our normal ship cleaning responsibilities (heads, soles (floors), deck wash and galley cleaning) after breakfast. Shortly thereafter, we made our way to the Museum of Wellington City & Sea. There we met with two local historians. The first gave us a very interesting presentation on Maori migration to New Zealand.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Nov

26

How to Make a Ship Look Really, Really, Really Good

Nina Whittaker, C Watch, Kenyon College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

We mustered on the quarter deck at 0800 this morning to see Queen’s Wharf in the bright sunlight. People were milling around (and inexplicably commuting to work in full suits on scooters), looking at the boat with great interest. Feeling self-conscious, the crew of the Robert C. Seamans sprang into action for an extreme makeover like no other. The two more worn sails (the mains’l and the mainstays’l) were taken down to be repaired/replaced, and the other sails were furled tightly, with the seams folded into cascades of precise white waves. Our watch ventured aloft, climbing up the foremast to furl and tuck the squares’ls.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Nov

25

SEA Semester Undergraduates Utilize Ocean Health Index to Investigate Climate Change & Conservation

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For Immediate Release: October 30, 2014


Woods Hole, MA— This fall, undergraduate students from top colleges and universities nationwide are utilizing the newly created Ocean Health Index to explore environmental issues related to climate change, conservation, and sustainability of the world’s oceans in a groundbreaking new study abroad program offered by Sea Education Association. SEA Semester: The Global Ocean, is the first undergraduate program in the world to incorporate metrics of the Ocean Health Index – a comprehensive, global evaluation of the human impact on the world’s oceans – into curriculum. Following a highly selective application process, these forty-four students are spending six weeks on shore at SEA Semester’s campus in Woods Hole, Massachusetts and six weeks at sea, sailing as crew and scientists onboard SEA Semester’s state-of-the-art ocean research vessels, operating in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

Nov

25

The Way to Windy Wellington

Laina Gray, A Watch, Canisius College
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

The way to Wellington was not a steady sail, but the day began as all important days do. C Watch came on deck for the 0700 to 1300 watch, greeted by the morning sun driving away the cloud cover and fog banks. But as the cliché goes, it was the calm before the storm. What began as a day beautiful enough for a carousel and Neuston tow quickly became a wet, rolling passage through the eastern side of Cook Strait (the waters that divide New Zealand’s North and South Islands).

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (4) CommentsPermalink

Nov

24

Mung is Thwarted, B-Watch Prevails!

Chris Marshall, B Watch, SUNY School of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF)
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

Thus far we’ve enjoyed six full days of life on New Zealand’s oceans. I think my peers and I have reached a consensus that we feel like those six days have felt like two weeks. Having a watch rotation each day has been incredibly different from the normal 9-5 day that most of us are used to. Each time we stand watch it seems that we have begun a new day, which is all sorts of bizarre. However, we are all becoming accustomed to this new lifestyle one way or another.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: s256 • (3) CommentsPermalink
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