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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: research


Jun

17

Stanford@SEA: Final Blog

Jan Witting, SEA Chief Scientist
Stanford@SEA

The sighting came while the ship was stopped so we could lower scientific instruments into the deep blue—for the last time.. A large white shape appeared just below the surface not 50 feet away from our side. It moved forward to aft and then disappearing behind us, among the whitecaps and glare of the sun. Moments later, it was back. This time the large creature was almost bobbing at the surface; this time presenting a clearly recognizable shape.  “Whale ho,” went out a cry from the quarterdeck.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

16

Measuring Forest Biomass

Franklina Yeboah, University of Maryland Eastern Shore
SEA Semester

My favorite day so far has been going into the field of Woods Hole Research Center in Falmouth Massachusetts to get a close look and collect data on the biomass of the different types of trees at the back of the Woods Hole Research Center. The purpose of this field work was to measure and monitor the above-ground of biomass and also see how carbon affects climate change. We started the field work by dividing ourselves into four different groups. Each group was given a compass, measuring tape, flags and a diameter measuring tape.

Categories: Woods Hole Partnership Education Program, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

15

New England’s Biodiversity

Miranda Van Allen, University of Rhode Island
SEA Semester

My favorite day so far has been going out into the field of Wood Neck Beach in Falmouth, Massachusetts to get a closer look and collect data on the biodiversity within a rocky intertidal habitat. Being from this area and working closely with the species that live throughout the New England coastlines, I felt very confident identifying different species and had so much fun being outdoors in the beautiful weather.

Categories: Woods Hole Partnership Education Program, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

14

Welcome PEP students

Ben Harden, Assistant Professor of Oceanography, SEA PEP Course Director

Last week, 16 students arrived on the SEA campus to take part in the Woods Hole Partnership Education Program (PEP). These students come from schools from across the States to spend 10 weeks in the Woods Hole Community undertaking a four-week course run by scientists from local institutions before heading into labs for six weeks of hands-on research.

Categories: Woods Hole Partnership Education Program, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

13

SEA To Host 6th Annual Sargasso Sea Symposium

Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu
SEA Semester

This one-day symposium is the capstone experience for students from SEA Semester class C-273, Marine Biodiversity & Conservation. The event includes oral presentations of the students’ research findings and policy recommendations to a panel of invited experts, and contributes directly to international effort to protect the Sargasso Sea.  Student presentations will be interspersed with related talks given by some of the invited participants. The public is invited to attend. Space is limited.

Categories: News, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

02

Stanford@SEA: Halfway

Rob Dunbar, Instructor, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

Dear Reader-

We’ve just passed our halfway day for Stanford@SEA 2017. As a veteran of over 100 oceanographic voyages, some of them nearly 3 months long, I can tell you that such days are always cause for comment and sometimes cause for celebration. The halfway day is most often called “hump day”, suggestive of a certain eagerness to soon be done with the sea and all that voyaging upon it entails. Not so the mood on the Robert C. Seamans.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

May

31

Stanford@SEA: A Teacher’s Perspective

R. Davis Born, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

Hello from your friendly neighborhood teaching assistant; feeling inspired and intimidated by the literary prowess of the ever-impressive Stanford undergraduates who have already contributed to this, the sole means by which we keep parents’ blood pressure down. We are once again underway, leaving behind the gem of an atoll on which I could wax poetic for hours had Hanna not already done so. So rather than paint the same word pictures the students have deftly crafted, I will instead attempt to spice up your reading material with perspectives from the most junior member of the teaching staff.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans, • Topic: research • (0) CommentsPermalink

May

21

Dolphins, Whales and 21st Birthdays

Annabelle Leahy, A Watch, Carleton College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

What a day on the Cramer! This is about to be a long blog, but I deemed it necessary to try to capture all that this day had to offer, so stick with me. Though every day has its excitement here on board, today was something to remember. We spent the day in the Hudson Canyon, the largest submarine canyon along the US Atlantic Coast, rivaling the depth and scale of the Grand Canyon, just southeast of New York City.

We got the opportunity to participate in the New York Seascape program, a program working to connect New York residents to their nearby ocean.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink

May

18

Paper Nautilus

Ridge Pierce, A Watch, Roger Williams University
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Today was another exciting day aboard the Cramer! I woke up this morning and had some extra delicious blueberry muffins for breakfast. I had morning watch this morning and today I was finally in lab, the first time since leaving Bermuda. Usually when I enter the lab, I always glance to the little shelf near the port side porthole where the cool specimens from the previous evening’s science station are kept so everyone can see them. I was especially excited once I walked into the lab this morning because I saw a creature that I didn’t even know existed- a Paper Nautilus.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink

May

16

Other Musings

Kata Rolf, Labhand, C-259 Alumna
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

My days onboard are more or less the same; at 0600 I get a wakeup for breakfast, which I inevitably ignore until 0700 when the second seating of breakfast is served. I’ll wander around haphazardly until 1000, when the ship goes hove to for morning station. I get my dipnet, my buckets, the saltwater hose and begin staring out at the sea for the next two hours, hoping to catch a glimpse of tiny spots of gold flecked among the vast expanses of blue water.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: research • (1) CommentsPermalink
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