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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: port stops


Feb

16

Soggy Socks Among Other Magical Things

Lydia Wasmer, A-Watch, Colby College
The Global Ocean

Yuck…it’s 0520. I’m on watch…meaning I have to meander around the boat and jot down numbers, expected to be fully awake while in realtity, there was only one eye open and two yawns for every footstep. However, the job was done in an orderly fashion (twice) and everyone, including our mascot, Steve, our cat (we don’t really have a cat) was safe.

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Feb

15

Day One

Shem Robinson, C Watch, Middlebury College
The Global Ocean

“Shem, it’s Cassie, its 6:15, breakfast is in 30 minutes” I heard through the white curtains of my bunk. In a sleepy haze I emerged and met eyes with Christina across from me looking equally as disoriented. We prepped for the day and met everyone in the salon while hot plates and steaming dishes assembled neatly on the table. Sabrina, our steward, cooked us veggie frittatas with a side of sausage and pineapple. Coffee in hand I sat to a delicious breakfast, listening as we all remarked on adjustments to our new sleeping conditions and excitement for the day.

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Feb

14

All Aboard!

Captain Chris Nolan, Assistant Professor of Nautical Science
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

All C-271 students are safely aboard SSV Corwith Cramer here in Gallows Bay, St. Croix.  This evening, we conducted some orientation training and safety discussions to make sure everyone is comfortable aboard our fine vessel. After a wonderful dinner provided by our steward, Kate, students are now finishing up packing into their bunks and starting to get sleepy.

 

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Feb

14

Haere mai ki Aotearoa (Welcome to New Zealand)

Jeff Wescott, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
The Global Ocean

The students, faculty, and crew of S-271, The Global Ocean: New Zealand, have all arrived aboard SSV Robert C. Seamans, docked in Auckland. Following two full days of intensive ship training, coupled with excursions to an island nature reserve and the Auckland War Memorial Museum, we will set sail for the Bay of Islands.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: port stops • (5) CommentsPermalink

Feb

04

Ashore in St John, USVI

Lisa Gilbert, Chief Scientist, Williams-Mystic
SEA Semester

Good afternoon from the SSV Corwith Cramer. This morning Williams-Mystic S17 went ashore in St John, U.S. Virgin Islands.  As the sun rose, we took the small boat ashore to gather on an empty beach for class and snorkeling. Prof. Mike Nishizaki and I discussed the geography, geology, conservation, and reef ecology of St John. Next, TA Hannah Whalen reviewed snorkeling safety.  Students put their notebooks down, and then paired up to explore the reef a few steps away.  As we swam, pelicans dove for small fish.

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Jan

20

End of a Successful Voyage

Audrey Meyer & Sarah Herard, SEA Chief Scientist & Captain, Corwith Cramer

We arrived in San Juan harbor early yesterday afternoon under light winds and calm seas, very different from the weather in which we had departed at the start of our voyage. The afternoon featured a field day to give our beloved Cramer a much-deserved cleaning, followed by a round of student research presentations on our quarterdeck classroom. The students did an excellent job with this, and it was exciting to see all that they had accomplished during the 10-day program.

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Jan

17

Back on Land! (For Now)

Trevor Holm, A Watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

Today was a day unlike the last six or seven. I was woken up around 1030 after a much needed long night’s rest, and was told we were going swimming! That was quite a change of pace from being awoken at 0620 for watch duties. I put on my swim suit and went up on deck to find we were anchored in beautiful Sun Bay off of an island called Vieques. About an hour later, we got debriefed on all the swimming rules, and then they let us go at it!

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Dec

20

We are all here

Brittany Mauer, 3d assistant scientist
Ocean Exploration

It was another day in paradise on board the Robert C. Seamans.  We were all gifted a little extra sleep last night.  The watches rotated back to their original mate and scientist watch officers to stand our last rotations of 9 mile watches.  We hauled back the anchor in Waiti Bay, motoring 27 miles over the 3 watches, to our current anchorage SSE of Stanley Point.  The coastline was stunning along this transit.  A pod of dolphins swam with us for some time.

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Dec

20

We are given to the wind and are scattered

Morgan A. Barrios, Steward, SEA Alumna
Oceans & Climate

The evening air is drenched in sweet tunes pouring from the lips and fingers of our talented crew as students and staff alike swing about the science deck, yet again, entrenched in a jovial contra dance. The dancing and giggling is only briefly and occasionally interrupted by the dregs of a hilariously long game of “mafia” and for short sips of secret recipe swizzle juice and cookies.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: port stops • (1) CommentsPermalink

Dec

15

Dominica Climate Resilience Explorations

Anthony Crespo, Anna von Brandis, Kelsee York, James Ducker, and Bethany Bowen, A watch
Oceans & Climate

Dominica was great! We had so much fun touring the island, cities, and rainforests! Of our two days ashore, one was spent exploring on our own, and the other was spent on the planned excursion. The individuals of A Watch traveled far and wide on Dominica: from Roseau to Portsmouth, Cabrits to Toucarie Bay, and even the north shore. We swam in a gorgeous waterfall, hiked a nature trail, and forged our way into a freshwater swimming hole.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: port stops • (1) CommentsPermalink
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