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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: port stops


Jun

11

Stanford@SEA: The Palmerston Community

Lindsay Allison, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

For this blog post I want to share something I wrote about our time in Palmerston a few weeks back. Its bit delayed, just like the time it took to process what an incredible experience it was.

Church hymns still resonating in our minds, the rhythm pulsing through our veins, we made our way to the gazebo area where Mary Marsters and her family ate lunch together on Sunday after church. We sat in silence waiting for all members of the family to arrive.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans, • Topic: port stops • (1) CommentsPermalink

Jun

07

Stanford@SEA: Arrival at the Kingdom of Tonga

Diego, Stanford

After 7 days at sea (8 if you go by the calendar), we have reached The Kingdom of Tonga. The ship’s calendar shifted at midnight and, just like that, June 6th never happened on the Robert C. Seamans. However, as some other posts have touched on, time morphs into a bizarre animal when rotating through watches, weather conditions, and the ocean’s restless motion.

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Jun

03

Stanford@SEA: Let’s Go Fishening

Chris, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

“You put your fingers in the gills like this and your thumb up on top. Then just rip the head off” John, the 18 year old Palmerstonian with a full, curly black beard, demonstrated the technique on a 12 inch long pink and silver parrot fish. Standing with waves breaking at our knees, Dylan, the engineer, and I tried and failed to repeat the process on two more parrot fish fish caught in the hand-woven net.  Jon came over to show us again. We moved down the net repeating the process as we went.

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May

30

Stanford@SEA: Perspectives of Palmerston Island

Hanna, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

A special little moment from May 26th thrown in:

May 26th 2017, Time: 1730

Perspectives from aloft:

I started this blog after spending an afternoon looking at the ocean from a slightly different perspective than I’ve become accustomed to on board Mama Seamans.

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May

29

Stanford@SEA: A Day on Palmerston

Chris, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

“Greetings to our guests and their families around the world. May Jesus bless them all.” Nano Marsters calls with a smile from the front right corner of the Palmerston church. She wears a flowing orange dress and a white laced hat adorned with colorful flowers, through the window behind her, palm trees sway in the wind. The audience in attendance, about half from our ship and half from the island, filled the eight pew church on this sunny Sunday morning.

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May

27

Stanford@SEA: Welcome to Palmerston

Lia, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

Today I woke up for morning watch anticipating a call of “Land ho!!” at some point in the following six hours. After three days at sea, today was the day we were to make it to our next island stop, a small island and coral atoll with, last we had heard, around 60 inhabitants. Nearing land, anticipation on the ship was high, as crew members lined the starboard rails, watching two small, metal boats belonging to local residents help the Robert C. Seamans navigate the reef and find a place to drop anchor.

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May

24

One Last Hoorah

Marie Spychala, C-Watch, Grinnell College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

It was a wonderful last full day in NYC as we got to explore behind-the-scenes of the New York Aquarium on Coney Island. After meeting with Dr. Merry Camhi, director of the New York Seascape project, and sharing research and observations from our survey of the Hudson Canyon, we headed off on a tour of the upcoming shark exhibit’s construction site. We looked pretty sharp and safe in our hard hats and reflective vests.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: port stops • (0) CommentsPermalink

May

24

New York, New Crew, and Endless Emotions

Maggie Schultz, B Watch, Mount Holyoke College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Inexpresable. If I could describe today in one word, it would be inexpresable. Our day was filled with realizations and puffy eyes as we navigated through the busy waters of New York City harbor. Realizations that today was our last day underway aboard the Corwith Cramer, that these could be our last sweats on the braces, our final sail firls, dawn watch, lookout and helm time. It was with a sense of accomplishment, excitement, and sadness that we docked at 0800 in Brookline Harbor, knowing that this was not a port stop, that we would be departing with all of our things in less than two days.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: port stops • (1) CommentsPermalink

May

23

Stanford@SEA: The sun is sweet but the wind is sweeter

Marianne, Stanford
Stanford@SEA

This morning on dawn watch, I left the lab to help set a sail and noticed a glowing light rise gently above the horizon, just off the starboard bow of the ship, in the northwest. I glanced at my watch, which read 04:15. The light was in the wrong direction and a bit early for sunrise, especially as we move into Southern Hemisphere autumn. It was land.

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May

14

Science and Policy Meet in Bermuda

Mark Howard Long, Ph. D., Associate Professor, History & Social Science
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Dear loyal readers,

After almost a week of field trips in Bermuda we are now making our way home. One of the aspects of teaching at SEA Semester that I find most rewarding is the way that we routinely examine the intersections between history, policy, science and exploration, all in an inter-/multi- disciplinary setting. Our time in Bermuda this week was spent investigating how all of these threads come together in this unique part of the world.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: port stops • (0) CommentsPermalink
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