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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: port stops


Feb

21

S251 Weblog 21 February 2014

Taylor Hogan, B watch, Northeastern University
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I’m swinging in a hammock strung between the forestays’l traveler and the forward port shrouds, preparing to write about my day today, which was just as full of activities as every other day this month. Three days ago, a very old woman taught us about the relationship the ancient people of Nuku Hiva had with sex and sexuality. Two days ago, we were greeted in Tahuata with an enormous feast and beautiful music and dancing, and with a cake with a single candle, presented to us in the hope that the Robert C. Seamans will return to the island in one year’s time.

Feb

20

S251 Weblog 20 February 2014

Cole Trager, C Watch, Hamilton College
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After our first full day in Tahuata, we were able to visit the town of Vaitahu to experience the island’s rich local culture for ourselves last night. The locals had prepared a massive feast for us, including poisson cru, coconut bread, goat meat, and a variety of other Marquesan specialties. We also had the privilege of watching some school children from the town perform traditional cultural songs and dances and were even able to learn a couple of our own. For me, this was by the far the most immersive connection we have had the opportunity to make with another community and I will continue to cherish this meaningful experience in the future.

Feb

19

S251 Weblog 20 February 2014

Evan Ridley, A Watch, University of Rhode Island
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On the night of the 18th, the Robert C. Seamans motored quietly into Vaitahu Bay besides the main village on the island of Tahuata.  Amid the inky darkness we could faintly see the outline of mountainous peaks looming above us.  The light of the next morning gave way to our sight of the landscape, rising well over 1,000 meters in some places with scatterings of palm trees, sandalwood and foraging goats.  With this new day we were greeted with a very hectic yet very exciting schedule. 

Feb

17

S251 Weblog 17 February 2014

Margaret Giese, B Watch, Macalester College
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Nuka Hiva is a place laden with history. Yesterday we got a glimpse of its history, as well as some of the natural marvels of the landscape, as we RV’ed around the island traveling to 4 different valleys—Taiohae, Taipivai, Hatiheu and Houmi—viewing the island from car windows with the occasional photo or historical pit stop along the way.  Many of us were more than happy to spend some time sitting down after the hike we went on the day before.  We happen to be in Nuka Hiva during its wet season so everything is especially green and the rivers especially full.

Feb

16

S251 Weblog 16 February 2014

Sarah Herard, Chief Mate, SEA Alum C-197
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Hello!
I’m Sarah, the Chief Mate of the Robert C. Seamans. Today I had an awesome day on the ship. We are at anchor in Nuku Hiva, a beautiful, green, volcanic island in the Marquesas. Our anchorage is in a protected bay with mountains towering high on three sides. We are about a mile in from the mouth of the bay, and there are smaller cruising sailboats anchored between us and the public dock.

Feb

15

S251 Weblog 15 February 2014

Levi Shaw-Faber, B Watch, Bard College 2015
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Today on a remote Polynesian island called Nuka Hiva, I got married. In a traditional Marquesan service, my hair and the hair of my current wife, Zoe Walpuck (Denison 2015), were woven together and bathed with soothing scented oils.  Zoe, after realizing what she had just done, quickly annulled the marriage so I guess I cannot call her my “current” wife any more. Oh well, it was good while it lasted.

It all started when the Robert C. Seamans pulled up, literally out of the blue, to a tall and dark island.

Feb

15

C251 Web Blog - 15 February 2014

Janet Bering, 3rd Assistant Scientist
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Greetings from the Atlantic Ocean! Class C251 is officially underway heading north (ish) (and hopefully east!) from San Juan, Puerto Rico. We are sailing full and by, beating to windward as we make our way towards Antigua, our first port stop.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: port stops • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

14

C251 Web Blog - 14 February 2014

Craig Marin, Maritime Studies Faculty
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The program “Ocean Exploration, Caribbean,” C-251, has now begun.  Thirteen students from ten different American colleges and schools have boarded the Corwith Cramer and have started their orientation for life aboard a tall ship—their “sea component.”  Some students arrived in San Juan a number of days ago with friends and family and have begun the “port stop” exploration that will be an integral part of the program.  The sixteenth-century walled city of Old San Juan will provide an excellent starting point for comparing and contrasting the histories, cultures and economies of the Caribbean island nations we visit.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: port stops • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

08

S251 Weblog 08 February 2014

Brianna Coughlin, A watch, Saint Michael’s College
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Our last full day on Fakarava was spent boating to the Southern pass and snorkeling among beautiful coral reefs. We began the day at 0800 with three local guides picking us up at Robert C. Seamans in their motorboats. Our ship is anchored near the northern pass and our goal for the day was to reach the southern pass—30 nautical miles away. Fakarava is essentially a giant rectangle with two passes and a calm lagoon in the middle. It’s difficult to grasp the scale of the atoll because when you’re standing on land facing the lagoon area you aren’t able to see the other side of the atoll.

Feb

07

S251 Weblog 07 February 2014

Anna Finkenauer, C Watch, University of Vermont
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Another day ashore on the beautiful atoll of Fakarava!  Today we were up bright and early to make our way to shore for a busy day of learning, sightseeing and fun. Our first stop of the day was Lulu, a pearl farm. Here we got to see how oysters are harvested and their pearls extracted. It was amazing to see the famous French Polynesian black pearls coming straight out of live oysters.

Next up was a visit to Yvonne, a sustainable farm on the ocean side (outer rim) of the island.

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