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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: new zealand


Feb

16

Soggy Socks Among Other Magical Things

Lydia Wasmer, A-Watch, Colby College
The Global Ocean

Yuck…it’s 0520. I’m on watch…meaning I have to meander around the boat and jot down numbers, expected to be fully awake while in realtity, there was only one eye open and two yawns for every footstep. However, the job was done in an orderly fashion (twice) and everyone, including our mascot, Steve, our cat (we don’t really have a cat) was safe.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: new zealand • (1) CommentsPermalink

Feb

15

Day One

Shem Robinson, C Watch, Middlebury College
The Global Ocean

“Shem, it’s Cassie, its 6:15, breakfast is in 30 minutes” I heard through the white curtains of my bunk. In a sleepy haze I emerged and met eyes with Christina across from me looking equally as disoriented. We prepped for the day and met everyone in the salon while hot plates and steaming dishes assembled neatly on the table. Sabrina, our steward, cooked us veggie frittatas with a side of sausage and pineapple. Coffee in hand I sat to a delicious breakfast, listening as we all remarked on adjustments to our new sleeping conditions and excitement for the day.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

14

Haere mai ki Aotearoa (Welcome to New Zealand)

Jeff Wescott, Assistant Professor of Anthropology
The Global Ocean

The students, faculty, and crew of S-271, The Global Ocean: New Zealand, have all arrived aboard SSV Robert C. Seamans, docked in Auckland. Following two full days of intensive ship training, coupled with excursions to an island nature reserve and the Auckland War Memorial Museum, we will set sail for the Bay of Islands.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: new zealand • (5) CommentsPermalink

Dec

20

We are all here

Brittany Mauer, 3d assistant scientist
Ocean Exploration

It was another day in paradise on board the Robert C. Seamans.  We were all gifted a little extra sleep last night.  The watches rotated back to their original mate and scientist watch officers to stand our last rotations of 9 mile watches.  We hauled back the anchor in Waiti Bay, motoring 27 miles over the 3 watches, to our current anchorage SSE of Stanley Point.  The coastline was stunning along this transit.  A pod of dolphins swam with us for some time.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

Dec

13

The Wings of A Gannet

Sarah Spiegler, A Watch, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

“In the end, we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we
understand and we will understand only what we are taught.” —Baba Dioum

Today was another “land day” for the students and crew of the Bobby C. We jumped off the ship at 0745 this morning and onto the waiting bus for a winding ride through the bucolic New Zealand countryside.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

Dec

12

Actual Kiwis

Biz Wallace, B Watch, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

We saw actual kiwis today! Our second day in port was off to a fantastic start with a visit to the National Aquarium of New Zealand-a convenient 20 minute walk from the port. Contrary to popular belief, kiwis are not tiny birds-they are chicken-sized. Lorna’s fun fact is that kiwis technically have the shortest beak of all bird species because the length of the beak is measured from the nostrils. We also saw the highly-anticipated feeding of the penguins, frightening spiny lobsters, and a huge sea turtle.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: new zealand • (1) CommentsPermalink

Dec

11

Nay-Nay Napier

Kyra Thompson & Sudeshana Karki, B Watch, Hawaii Pacific College & A Watch, Nepal
Ocean Exploration

Kia Ora from Napier! We are finally on land after three weeks of deep water sailing.

It is a little overwhelming. The Brigantine doesn’t rock too much, the ocean sounds different and you can walk on land. It is funny how you can get used to water in three short weeks and they say we are not made to live in the ocean. When we got dropped off at the dock gate, everyone ran to the black pebbly beach. Maybe it was a sense of freedom or maybe it was just our remedy to withdrawal from the sea.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

Nov

19

Field Day

Helen Dufel, B Watch, Deckhand
Ocean Exploration

When you think of Field Day you probably envision three legged races and egg tosses. On the Robert C. Seamans it’s even better! Field day happens about once a week and this is our chance to scrub every surface and corner on the boat. Different from our Daily Cleaning, Field Day takes a couple hours and a whole lot of team work. All hands are necessary and dancing is greatly encouraged. At this time, each watch is assigned a section of the boat and you can enjoy various genres of music as you pass from one end of the ship to the other.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

Nov

18

A day in the Bay of Islands

Marcel de Wilde , C Watch
Ocean Exploration

Ok. Lets set something straight here. Its tOmato people. Not tAmato. Nuh uh.

My name is Marcel and I’m the only Kiwi on a boat full of Americans sailing through the South Pacific. HELP ME.  When I notice the wind picking up and the temperature dropping I tell my fellow crew members to go “chuck on a jersey”, but all I receive are weird looks and eye rolling.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: new zealand • (0) CommentsPermalink

Mar

25

A Toast to Tangaroa (aka Neptune)

Alex Salesin, C-Watch, University of Virginia
The Global Ocean: New Zealand

As our time on the Seamans draws to a close, I think most of us are wishing we could tie ourselves to the ship with our well-practiced knot knowledge and never leave. After our swizzle tonight, which will consist of lighthearted talents and debauchery no doubt, we will go our separate ways.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: new zealand • (1) CommentsPermalink
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