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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: life at sea


Apr

23

First Rain

Yage Wang, C Watch, Brandeis University
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

今天可能是在克雷姆(Cramer 船名)上最不平稳的一天了。凌晨的岗位(1:00-7:00)一直在用引擎来帮助前行。当我们上午的岗位(7:00-13:00)快结束 时,天空下起了小雨。我换下班来,吃完了美味的午餐,chili 和corn bread (各种 豆子做的汤和玉米面包),立刻钻进了我的床上,享受我凌晨岗位前的12个小时。

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

22

Having a Field Day!

Rachel Burdorf, A Watch, Colorado College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Greetings all,
Today we deep-cleaned the Cramer! Instead of having class in the afternoon, we split into watches and cleaned the whole below decks area. A Watch took the Galley, B watch took the Main Salon, and C watch took the aft cabins. We clean the Cramer thoroughly every day, because grime magically appears even when we’re at sea, but today we stepped it up a notch and got everything we might have missed during the week.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

21

Cramer Gybes and Students’ First Dip Net!

Paige Petit, A Watch, College of the Holy Cross
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Greetings, all!

After spending a few hours feeling nauseous at every trip below decks yesterday, it is amazing that I was able to spend most of my 6 hour watch as the dish assistant today in the galley! It feels great to (hopefully) be acquiring some sea legs, of course attributing most credit to medicine, a full belly, and a hydrated body. As a “newbie” aboard the Cramer, the crew is nothing but kind and positive.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

13

Promesas a Las Estrellas

Romina Jimenez-Alvarez , Barnard College
Ocean Exploration

There are twenty-four hours in a day and we use every minute of it. Thus, this blog post is for April 13th, and starts promptly at midnight. We were continuing East on a starboard tack under the Stays’ls. I had just relieved my shipmate from bow watch and took his spot standing on lookout in the foremost part of the ship. I fastened my harness around the Stays’l line and looked out into the horizon. There was a light breeze, and the sea rippled with the appearance of scales. Beaufort force 2. It appeared as if were sailing through the moonlight.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

Apr

12

Far Away From Anywhere…

Annika Savio, Assistant Engineer
Ocean Exploration

I’m sailing my first trip as a dayworker (I sleep at night and work during the day instead of standing watch), so I’ve been able to come up on deck and join the dawn watch for absolutely stunning sunrises the past few days. I know that there is beauty all over the world, but knowing that we are about 700 nautical miles from the nearest point of land makes the ocean seem endless, and the sunrise even more beautiful.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

11

Eating the Heart of the Sea

Lily Anna Segalman, C Watch, George Washington University
Ocean Exploration

Once upon a time there was a group of sailors.  In their hearts they knew that there were fish out in the deep blue ocean, but where were they?

Their lines got taken, and day by day they came up with nothing.  These poor sailors did not know what to do.  They even ate (amazing) sushi with shrimp salad and smoked salmon in hopes of bringing in the fish.  Their moral were down, no hope of fish on the horizon, then it happened.  A TUNA!!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

Apr

09

Rockin’ and Rollin’ (But thankfully not as much)

Lily Anna Segalman, C-Watch, The George Washington University
Ocean Exploration

I think the highlight (besides the chai tea and cookies for snack) of today was that while walking around the deck, I forgot we were on a boat.

The swells are still large, but today I was able to walk around the engine room without creating a new bruise somewhere on my body.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

08

How’s S-272 Feeling Today?

Carina Spiro, C-watch, Bowdoin College
Ocean Exploration

As I’m sure won’t come as a surprise to anyone who knows me, I’ve spent the few spare moments of the trip so far reading a book about math for fun (thanks dad!). Several unsuspecting shipmates, upon lightheartedly making fun of me or questioning what I was reading, have found themselves subjected to a longer than expected (or desired) conversation about statistics. So I thought I’d try and wrangle up some statistics about how people on the ship are feeling today.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

Apr

07

Roaring Forties Come Roaring Back!

Spencer Herda, C Watch, sailing intern
Ocean Exploration

Well! Dawn watch had an interesting time as the weather arose seemingly out of nowhere (it is hard to see cloud activity in the dark). Near the end of our watch it really picked up and we had to strike the jib and storm trys’l before breakfast. The captain gave us compliments on our no complaints attitude as we were called back on deck to finish some sail handling, especially Carina’s helmsmanship in the peak of the squall! Way to go C Watch!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

06

Sailing East!

Jacquelyn Wu, B Watch, Bowdoin College
Ocean Exploration

We woke up to the sound of rattling and banging this morning, along with a change in how the boat tossed and turned us in our bunks, just a few moments before B watch (my watch) was to be woken up for Dawn Watch from 0100-0700.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink
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