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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: life at sea


Feb

15

Setting Sail for Dominica

Craig Marin, Maritime Studies
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

The sea voyage for program C-271, Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, has now officially begun. Thirteen students from nine different American colleges and universities are now appropriately oriented to their new mobile home, the Corwith Cramer, and they all took part in the casting off of dock lines that got the ship moving out of our berth in Gallows Bay and into the Caribbean Sea. Spirits were high and there was plenty of good, hard work done by all to get our sails set and the ship properly ordered for the first leg of this voyage.

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Feb

07

Science Presentations

Lisa Gilbert, Chief Scientist, Williams-Mystic
SEA Semester

Good morning from the SSV Corwith Cramer.  We are heading toward Norman Island, BVI, with Junior Watch Officer Clay (SUNY Maritime) and A watch on deck.  Moments ago, we struck the topsail, after a morning downwind sail. Through the night, the watches worked with one of their own as Junior Watch Officer to set us up for an easy approach to Normal Island and they did an excellent job!

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Feb

06

Birthday at Sea

Lisa Gilbert, Chief Scientist, Williams-Mystic
SEA Semester

Good morning from the SSV Corwith Cramer!

On Sunday, February 5, a pod of dolphins surfed our bow wake at sunrise.

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Jan

19

Shore’s in Sight But Memories Will Stay at Sea

Josh Trimboli, B watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

The morning began with astonishing moments; San Juan to our backs, the lights making the island of Puerto Rico look like a Christmas tree that filled the sky with light and drowned out the stars. Yet to our port the stars prevailed, covering the black canvas with millions of specks radiating light to the horizon.

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Jan

16

B Watch Up High; Drill, Drill, Drill!

Jack Haught, C Watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

My day began at 0100 this morning. C Watch was posted at dawn watch (0100 to 0700), and I was in need of a nap. After a delicious breakfast, that is exactly what I did.  So my day really began at 1145. At this time, I could hear B Watch preparing to go aloft, high above the deck in the rigging of the ship. This event is one of utmost importance on our voyage. The crew have tantalized us all with the opportunity to go aloft.

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Jan

15

Moonbows and Neuston Tows

Martha Carter, A Watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

Imagine a rainbow made of varying shades of silver extending completely across the night sky.  I had no idea that this, to which we coined the term “moonbow,” existed before I saw it last night.  We had just sailed through some squalls during our evening watch; it was raining, and the boat was getting knocked around in the waves, making lab work difficult to say the least. Suddenly, the storm passed and everything was calm until Gracie busted through the lab door shouting, “Guys! There’s a rainbow. AT NIGHT!”

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Jan

12

Learning the Boat

Brittany, A Watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

Today was an absolutely gorgeous day. We got to work a lot on sail handling, and on learning the names and locations of things in general. We started by putting the main’sl up and all the lines associated with this: the halyard, the downhaul, and the sheet. It’s very fun for me to see the different sail plans and names for things as I am a collegiate and much smaller boat sailor. My arms are a little tired today as there are no self-tailing winches or blocks with cleats, and the traveler takes at least three people to operate.

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Jan

11

All At Sea

Thatcher Creber, B Watch, Miami University
Miami University

Today began at 0600 hours with a breakfast call for the majority of the SSV Corwith Cramer crew. However, a few unfortunate victims remained sleeping due to the placid San Juan Harbor, now a distant oasis. Breakfast consisted of waffles, eggs, bacon, vegan options for our animal lovers and a bucket full of Nutella that Bex had bewittingly hidden from us the day before. Following breakfast we received instructions for our Daily Cleanup (DC). The Corwith Cramer is decked out with environmentally friendly products, and swiffer sweepers named after pirates that we use to keep the soles, heads and showers in tip top shape.

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Jan

10

Welcome aboard!

Audrey Meyer, Chief Scientist

Welcome to the SEA Miami of Ohio program. I’m happy to report that, after an arduous day of air travel yesterday, all 16 Miami of Ohio participants (14 students, their professor Rachael Morgan-Kiss, and TA Shasten Sherwell) all boarded the Corwith Cramer in Old San Juan, Puerto Rico at 1100 this morning.  After a quick muster on the quarterdeck for introductions, we transited the ship to a nearby anchorage in San Juan Harbor, blissfully leaving hordes of noisy passing cruise ship tourists behind.

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Dec

19

Mr. Spatchy

Anthony Crespo, A Watch, Syracuse University
Oceans & Climate

This story is inspired by a journal entry by a spatula… A.K.A Mr. Spatchy

I woke up in the morning with a big smile in my face, thinking of all the hard work to come. I started cleaning what I heard was called Puerto Rican scrambled eggs with coconut bread that smelled really good from the Galley cavern. It was pretty interesting looking from upside down at two giants that were having fun mixing and crafting in their magic caldera a wonderful treat that I had to eventually clean.

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