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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: life at sea


Feb

19

A Birthday at Sea

Austin Sun, C Watch, Colgate University
The Global Ocean

As a photographer, I try capturing what I think is beautiful in my pictures. I’ve been lucky enough to photograph amazing places such as the deserts of Arizona to the snowy peaks of Niseko, Japan. At these amazing places, I’ve always been able to capture beautiful moments in some way. A waterfall. A sunrise. The milky way. The possibilities are endless. Coming on the Robert C. Seamans, I thought that I would be able share the beautiful moments on board with photography.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

18

Helm and Sky – Moments on the Cramer

William Fitzgerald, A Watch, Knox College

The Helm:
So far, I have had the joy of having a few hours at the helm of the ship. It is a powerful moment in my general watch duties because it gives me the power of navigation; the ability to take our vessel to where ever we may desire. With this power comes some of the boats eccentricities. The steering is not as smooth as one might expect.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

18

Dolphins at the Port Bow, Scrubbed Decks, and Setting Sails

Adam Tigar, C Watch, Carleton College
The Global Ocean

As we prepared to raise the anchor, C watch (my watch) began the sea watch structure of six hours on, 12 hours off by waking up from an interrupted night of sleep at 0600. Kate P. and Sabrina crushed the first meal, starting off the day with scrambled eggs, potatoes with onions and peppers, and bacon. Watch began at 0700 on deck with Austin, Anna J, 3rd mate Eric, and myself scrubbing the decks with freshwater.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

17

We Are Here

Michaela J. Kenward , A Watch, University of New England
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

I could hardly believe it when Jeff reminded me that today – Friday – was my turn to write this blog. It’s hard to believe we’ve already been sailing for that many days. In my mind, all of the hours of the past few days have blurred together into one very, very long day, broken up by very satisfying naps. However, the passage of time is very evident not only by our movement through the clear blue Caribbean waters, but by the weathering skin and tired eyes of all of those aboard Mama Cramer.

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Feb

17

Under Way, At Last…

Sierra Toomey, B-Watch, Eckerd College
The Global Ocean

The day began at 0630, Kate’s soft voice floated through the beige curtains that surrounded my bunk as she woke Peyten down the hall. I peeked my head out peering around, eyes clouded with the last remnants of sleep. “Good morning, breakfast is in fifteen minutes and it’s raining” was the message being spread to those of us who had just awoken. I ducked back into my bunk, dressed and walked down to the salon for piles of pancakes, sausages, and grapefruit.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

15

Setting Sail for Dominica

Craig Marin, Maritime Studies
Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean

The sea voyage for program C-271, Colonization to Conservation in the Caribbean, has now officially begun. Thirteen students from nine different American colleges and universities are now appropriately oriented to their new mobile home, the Corwith Cramer, and they all took part in the casting off of dock lines that got the ship moving out of our berth in Gallows Bay and into the Caribbean Sea. Spirits were high and there was plenty of good, hard work done by all to get our sails set and the ship properly ordered for the first leg of this voyage.

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Feb

07

Science Presentations

Lisa Gilbert, Chief Scientist, Williams-Mystic
SEA Semester

Good morning from the SSV Corwith Cramer.  We are heading toward Norman Island, BVI, with Junior Watch Officer Clay (SUNY Maritime) and A watch on deck.  Moments ago, we struck the topsail, after a morning downwind sail. Through the night, the watches worked with one of their own as Junior Watch Officer to set us up for an easy approach to Normal Island and they did an excellent job!

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

06

Birthday at Sea

Lisa Gilbert, Chief Scientist, Williams-Mystic
SEA Semester

Good morning from the SSV Corwith Cramer!

On Sunday, February 5, a pod of dolphins surfed our bow wake at sunrise.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jan

19

Shore’s in Sight But Memories Will Stay at Sea

Josh Trimboli, B watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

The morning began with astonishing moments; San Juan to our backs, the lights making the island of Puerto Rico look like a Christmas tree that filled the sky with light and drowned out the stars. Yet to our port the stars prevailed, covering the black canvas with millions of specks radiating light to the horizon.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topic: life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jan

16

B Watch Up High; Drill, Drill, Drill!

Jack Haught, C Watch, Miami University
SEA Semester

My day began at 0100 this morning. C Watch was posted at dawn watch (0100 to 0700), and I was in need of a nap. After a delicious breakfast, that is exactly what I did.  So my day really began at 1145. At this time, I could hear B Watch preparing to go aloft, high above the deck in the rigging of the ship. This event is one of utmost importance on our voyage. The crew have tantalized us all with the opportunity to go aloft.

Categories: Corwith Cramer, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink
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