• Like Sea Education Association on Facebook
  • Follow Sea Education Association on Twitter
  • Follow SEA Semester on Instagram
  • Watch Sea Education Association on YouTube
  • Read SEA Currents
  • Listen to SEA Stories
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: life at sea


Oct

31

Halloween comes to the Corwith Cramer

Chris Driscoll, A Watch, Stonehill College
Ocean Exploration

Happy Halloween everybody!

So where to begin so much has happened just today and it’s hard to figure out where to start. I guess I’ll start with this, today was the beginning of phase II, The Shadow Phase. During this phase, we students are given more opportunities to be put into leadership rolls. That could be anywhere from calling the striking or a setting a sail or calling a gybe (that’s a way of turning the boat, mostly used to get ready for science).

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (5) CommentsPermalink

Oct

30

One Thousand Nautical Miles

Carolyn Hanrahan, C-Watch, Sturgis Charter School
Ocean Exploration

Salutations, civilization!

I don’t even know where to begin when attempting to describe to you my time onboard the ship thus far. It has been a crazy time of ups and downs, all of which are memorable in their own ways. Thankfully for me, most of the seasickness has finally passed (besides the natural fatigue that accompanies life onboard).

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (4) CommentsPermalink

Oct

29

Flying Fish

Nate Bears, Chief Engineer
SEA Semester

Hello Folks!

Another beautiful day and another beautiful sunrise and sunset.  Out here in the middle of the ocean, these are my favorite thing to move relative to… that and 6 meals a day!

The seas have been laying down a bit, making working and moving around the vessel a bit easier.  The Main Engine has been off for a good chunk of the last two days, which is nice for the engineer.  Makes my world a bit quieter and cooler.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (3) CommentsPermalink

Oct

28

DEFEATING THE MUNG: Field Day #1

Emma Tolerton, C Watch, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

Greetings from the Corwith Cramer crew! Hope everyone on land is having (had?) a great weekend! I’m writing to you from the freshly cleaned library of our freshly cleaned ship! Today was field day and for those of you not in the know and wondering how we could possibly host a lively array of lawn activities and sporting events on a tall ship in the middle of the ocean, field day is when we clean the ship from the heads to the soles!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

Oct

27

24 Hours is Not Enough

Celine Yam, A Watch, Hamilton College
SEA Semester

Over the past few days, the rough waves, interesting shower situations, and deck restrictions have triggered many spiritual conversations with Poseidon in search of smoother sailing. Someone must have spoken to him ‘cause this morning, we woke up to the open deck sign and gentler waves.

It’s hard to believe how little time has passed because I feel like we have been up to so much during the 9 days C-275 has spent on the Cramer. Last Friday, we left the WHOI dock and this Friday, we find ourselves in full watch schedules, working on our Creature Feature Infotainment assignment, and most urgent and exciting learning the lines in preparation for the Great Line Chase on Monday! There seems to be so much to look forward to.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

Oct

27

Listening for Whales off Tonga

Erin Adams, 2nd Assistant Scientist
SEA Semester

We have been deploying a hydrophone each morning during our science station to hopefully pick up on whale song along our cruise track. Humpback whales breed and calve in Tongan waters each year and we’ve seen them blow, breach, and flap around periodically.

One question we’ve faced while listening to the hydrophone is, what noises are generated from the boat and what sounds are actually from the whales?

Today, during our hydrophone, the science team was able to isolate vessel noises thanks to support from Ted and Mike, our engineers on board.

Oct

26

Can’t Spell Competition Without C (watch)

Nikki Blair, C Watch, Colorado College
SPICE

Back in Woods Hole our captain, Jay,  had told us that we will make a ton of mistakes which is encouraged, but the key is to not make the same one twice. Today was our 30th day on the ship and I’m still managing to make a million mistakes a day. Each watch holds a new challenge and with it a plethora of ways to screw it up. However today for C watch was a rather successful day. We all rolled out of bed just before noon after a very strange evening watch.

Oct

26

A Bucket Full of Hope

Grayson Huston, 3rd Assistant Scientist
Ocean Exploration

In times of frustration, hardship, sorrow, or in this instance, very inclement weather, we often look to someone or something that acts as a beacon of hope. In the last 24 hours, for myself, my mate on watch, and several others aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer, this shining light in the darkness has come in the form of a tiny, white bucket – one that is frequently overlooked and often, quite literally thought of as trash.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink

Oct

25

Thirty Days On

Sarah Towne, B Watch Cornell University
SPICE

Today marks one month since my shipmates and I boarded the ship in American Samoa. In many ways the time aboard has flown, yet Pago Pago seems like ages ago. The boat has definitely become my home in these short 30 days. It’s tough to imagine taking a shower everyday, sleeping in a perfectly still bed, or being awakened by an alarm. Ship life is my new normal, and I kind of dig it.

Oct

25

Dawn Watch in a Squall

Mercer Lynch, C Watch, Gilman School
Ocean Exploration

As C-275 falls into the rhythm of life onboard Cramer I think a realization has come to all of us, that hours on watch seem to crawl by while days at sea are faster than the blink of an eye. Thinking of my upcoming evening watch is almost stunning as I swear I was just sleeping through breakfast after going to sleep at 0130 yesterday. Our schedule is hectic for sure but I can definitely feel myself slipping in and becoming part of the organized chaos.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink
Page 3 of 43 pages  < 1 2 3 4 5 >  Last ›