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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: celestial navigation


Aug

01

Nikumaroru Atoll

Claire Bradham, B Watch, Kenyon College
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

My day started at 00:30, when I woke up to Veronica whispering my name. Twenty minutes later, I was standing on the deck in the moonlight ready for dawn watch. On the northern horizon, we could barely see the dark stripe that was the island of Nikumaroro. There is a particular spot by the island where we wanted to do our scientific sampling, but we planned to approach it during the day. So we had a pretty unusual watch, in that we were hove to (stopped) all night, drifting slowly with the wind.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: celestial navigation • (2) CommentsPermalink

Jul

28

Lessons from Night Watch

Kate Benson, A Watch, Stetson University
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

After a particularly damp and dreary night watch, I thought I’d spend a few minutes sharing my newly acquired nuggets of wisdom on…

Life Lessons Learned on Night Watch: Tips and Tricks for Surviving 7pm to 1am

- Memorize the lines before dark – Knowing which ropes to haul or ease is imperative for smooth sailing. If you don’t know which line is which when you can see them, imagine how much harder it is when you can’t. Memorize your lines before the sun goes down.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: celestial navigation • (1) CommentsPermalink

Jul

15

Looking Inward

William Moreno, A Watch, University of Richmond
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

According to Captain Nolan, every sea-story should begin with “There I was….”

There I was…standing on the starboard edge of the quarterdeck, I was overtaken by a surging feeling of immense smallness looking out at the ocean at night, surrounded on all sides by the huge expanse of the central Pacific with a magnificent tapestry of stars.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: celestial navigation • (1) CommentsPermalink

May

02

Sailing and Science under the Stars

Annabelle Leahy, A Watch, Carleton College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

My day started and ended under the stars. The day technically began watching a triple stack of nets go down to 100 meters for one last sampling from the South Sargasso Sea. As Marie mentioned before, there’s a certain amount of coordination (which we all sometimes lack) required to set up a wire deployment at night, hoping you don’t knock anything overboard or trip over anything. Even with these difficulties, there is something about science under the stars that is pretty unreal.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: celestial navigation • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

30

An Island of Our Own

Turi Abbott, B Watch, The George Washington University
Ocean Exploration

It was the beginning of dawn watch. And everyone knows that dawn watch is the birth place of deep and somewhat ridiculous thoughts. But on this dawn watch, I was on the struggle bus. I was at the helm, staring intently at the red light on the compass, trying to keep the ship I was trusted with on course. Scott was giving us an evening star lesson, where all of us gaped at the expansive and wondrous celestial sphere. No light pollution, no limits in how long our horizon could run. We were discussing the naming of stars and who figured out what is where in our galaxy when Scott mentioned that plankton and planets have the same root word- meaning wanderer.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

30

Surf’s Up

Matt Glasenapp, B Watch, Macalester College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Another day has come and gone aboard the Cramer.  I can’t believe we’ve been at sea for almost two weeks already!  It was a warm and beautiful sunny day, although a strong twenty knot wind producing six to eight foot waves had some feeling unwell.  Our watch group (B) was supposed to undergo a training for going aloft onto the fore mast today, but the rough sea state prevented us from doing so. I spent the afternoon in lab with Maggie and Grayson, our assistant scientist, counting microplastics and identifying zooplankton and Sargassum fauna from our morning station Neuston tow.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: celestial navigation • (1) CommentsPermalink

Apr

26

En Route to Bermuda

Julian Pedraza, C Watch, Universidad de los Andes
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Every day since we boarded the Cramer it has been a process of learning, overcoming and achieving. Today, while every team works on their research projects with a different organism, I’m sure I speak for most of my shipmates when I say that this experience has been an opportunity to appreciate the world in a different way, conceive the ocean as a vast and living organism hiding life in every droplet of water, where everything is tightly related. For us, this has revealed a new vision of the ocean.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: celestial navigation • (3) CommentsPermalink

Apr

25

“Wow, what an exciting day!” – me, every day

Jana Maravi, B watch, Rochester Institute of Technology
Ocean Exploration

There truly is no limit to the excitement on board here. I especially felt this way today, which also happens to be my favorite schedule. We (B/Best watch) had night watch last night (1900-0100), meaning we got a semi-normal night sleep and then the whole morning until lunch free to ourselves. For me, that meant starting off with an awesome breakfast quiche made by Angel, even though I slept right through 0700 breakfast (she’s the sweetest).

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: celestial navigation • (7) CommentsPermalink

Apr

24

The Beginning of the End

Marcia Campbell, C-Watch, Eckerd College
Ocean Exploration

Hello world! To you, it’s Day 26 of our ocean voyage…but our watch rotations make for 18-hour days, so today feels more like Day 35 for us. It’s been one crazy rollercoaster ride having weathered out the effects of two cyclones but thankfully, the weather has finally steadied up a bit and both air and water temperatures are on the rise as we go farther north. Also, we broke 3000 nm today and are currently within 150 nm to the island of Raivavae!!!

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Ocean Exploration, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Feb

27

Lost and Found at Sea

Anna Cerf, A Watch, Middlebury College
The Global Ocean

Growing up, I prided myself on having a decent sense of direction. I generally played the role of “navigator” with whomever I hiked, drove, or ran with.  I figured that coming into SEA Semester I would be able to transfer this ability and that hopefully it would help compensate for my complete lack of knowledge re: anything having to do with boats.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink
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