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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: celestial navigation


Jun

09

Safety drill: Oscar has been saved

Sarah McTague, C Watch, Stony Brook University
Transatlantic Crossing

Today marks the sixth day at sea for us here aboard the SSV Corwith Cramer. It has been a lovely day filled with sunshine and plenty of smiles as the last of us have finally reached the end of our sea sickness. For C watch, our day started last night on our watch from 1900-2300. We were amazed by one of the most beautiful sunsets you could imagine, which several people said looked like it was painted across the sky.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

07

The tide is high, but I’m holding on!

Sarah J Hindle, SUNY-ESF
Transatlantic Crossing

Day 4 at sea, and it already feels like weeks.  From the moment we boarded the Cramer in Woods Hole, there has been so much to learn and see and do. From music on the quarterdeck to watching dolphin pods skip playfully out of the water under the bow net, it has been an exhilarating experience thus far! It’s pretty hard to believe we’ve only been underway for three days. In that time, we’ve collected plankton net samples, neuston tows, and hydrocast data, and have raised and lowered most of the sails on the ship.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topic: celestial navigation • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

07

Sunrise, Sunset, and Stars!

Matt Hemler, C Watch, Northeastern University
Oceans & Climate

One phenomenon of the rotational watch schedule is that on one day out of every three, you stand afternoon watch (1300-1900) and see the sun set, followed by dawn watch (0300-0700) where you get to enjoy the sunrise. It makes for a bizarre sleep schedule but on a clear night it is well worth it. Last night was one of the most incredible views of the sky I have ever seen.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: celestial navigation • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

03

Time: A Human Invention of Great Use at Sea

Arthur Davis, C Watch, Oberlin College
Oceans & Climate

Today marks the first 24 hour period that we will observe as the 3rd of April.  How is this possible? Tonight we will cross the International Date Line, which, unlike the equator, tropics, or ant/arctic circles, does not represent any change in natural phenomena. It is rather the other side of the prime meridian (itself an arbitrary line) that runs through Greenwich, England.  Although it is arbitrary, the Date Line is important because of our attention to time.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: celestial navigation • (1) CommentsPermalink

Jul

22

Stargazing

Annie Rich / Codie Kyle , Sweet Briar College / College of Charleston

Annie and Codie here, reporting from the Science Lab with Juliana, our personal scientist, while reminiscing about our adventures jumping off the bowsprit during our first swim call on our voyage. The water was very refreshing and a special treat! To top off another perfect day at sea we got to see the “Green Flash” which we had just learned about the other day from Codie!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Historic Seaports of Western Europe, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jul

11

Approach to the Equator

Marissa Shaw, B Watch, Sailing Intern
pic

Hello to all you Lovely Land Lubbers (We love alliterations here aboard the Mama Seamans), this is Marissa, 1/3 of the D.O.D, or Department of Deckhands that is sailing this awesome PIPA SEA Semester.  Today has been yet another glorious day aboard, and as we pasted through the meteorological equator aka the Doldrums, aka the ITCZ, we have been able to secure the Main Engine and sail once more.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Protecting the Phoenix Islands, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

22

Ship, Shipmates, Self

Christine Edgeworth, A Watch, Syracuse University
pic

Aloha friends and family!

It’s hard to believe that it’s only day four at sea. The days have practically melted together as we’ve been jam packed with standing watch, scarfing down delicious food, deploying science gear, learning about our new home aboard the Robert C. Seamans, napping on occasion, and tapping into our inner sailors.

The first thing I learned after stepping on board the ship was a little saying that goes, “Ship, Shipmates, Self.”

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Aloha 'Aina: People & Nature in the Hawaiian Islands, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Jun

04

C253 Web Blog - 04 June 2014

Gabriell Fraser
pic

Hey everyone, Gabby here! We’ve been on “Mama Cramer” for four days now and things are starting to get easier. Some people have been battling sea sickness and donating to Neptune (myself being one of those people). Most everyone is through that rough stage and our inner ears are adjusting to the rolling motion. Life aboard the ship is becoming an easier routine and is going great so far.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

04

Community Building

Sam Eley, C Watch, Bowdoin College
pic

Ahoy from the Robert C. Seamans!
It’s been just over 5 days since the last palm tree on Rangiroa faded from sight in an approaching squall and we’ve seen no land since. We’re now dancing over swells nearly 400 nautical miles as the albatross flies from Rangiroa and have over 200 nautical miles to go to Nuku Hiva! With distances measured in hundreds of miles and travel time measured in days, it’s so important for our little community aboard the Seamans to live and work cohesively together all of the time.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink

Apr

03

The Seafaring Life

Emilie Hickox, B Watch, Allegheny College
pic

It seems everyone is settling deeper into the seafaring life aboard the Seamans. I have observed more and more people awake when they are not on watch. Perhaps because for the most part we have all gained our sea legs and are no longer exhausted from sea sickness and the new sleeping routine. Today, I got closer to accomplishing one of my lifetime goals of learning how to use the sextant. Many of us took advantage of the clear skies and used the sextants to ‘shoot some sun lines’, precompute our local apparent noon and then find our angle at that time to ultimately try to find our latitude.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: celestial navigation • (0) CommentsPermalink
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