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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: c263


Dec

11

Blue, blue, blue, blue, blue

Janet Bering, 2nd Assistant Scientist
Oceans & Climate

I think in almost every blog, the crew has mentioned the slipperyness of time out at sea. How six hours can feel like twelve, but three days blur together into one. And now, suddenly, startlingly, we are anticipating sighting land after almost a full month at sea. Land will bring green back into our lives, after a month of blue, blue, blue, blue.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (5) CommentsPermalink

Dec

10

I’m Dreaming of a Hot Christmas

Jennifer Kenyon, A watch, Louisiana State University
Oceans & Climate

It’s difficult for me to write blog posts, because no matter how many hours I spend alone with my thoughts at bow lookout I still cannot find the adequate words to describe this experience. I have moments where everything still seems new, and that this journey has just begun. Every day I am still learning new things about sailing, the crew, and even about myself. No night goes by that I am not completely enraptured by the dazzling sky above me, although I have spent countless of hours now working beneath it.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (8) CommentsPermalink

Dec

09

Keep the Sun over the Life Ring

Tristan Feldman, Third Mate
Oceans & Climate

As I am writing this, we just finished our final hour of non-instrument sailing. I was both excited and slightly apprehensive when we first covered up the compass and stopped using sextants to get fixes multiple times a day. This experiment in navigation was not only completely new for all of our students, but it was also new for me and the other mates. I have to say that I think most people enjoyed it and learned immensely (there was a chorus of boos at class today when Captain Jason announced that the non-instrument run would be ending at 1700 today).

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Dec

08

Taking On All Deck & Lab Responsibilities

Jennifer Dong, Grinnell College
Oceans & Climate

Today marks the day that we entered the third and final phase of our deck and lab responsibilities. We’ve begun to acquire the fond titles of “J-WO” and “J-LO” to signify the shipmate who will be the designated junior watch/lab officer for the watch. That’s right- the location and safety of 30 people rests on alternating students that began their sailing experience about a month ago. Luckily, our mates, scientists and trusty captain assure us that they will swoop in should something seem wrong. It’s crazy to think how much we’ve learned in this past month and how much more there is to learn!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Dec

07

Sounds on a Ship and Fish!

Anna Simpson, A Watch, University of New Hampshire
Oceans & Climate

Hello family and friends of everyone aboard!

It’s funny how different places have such different and distinctive background sounds, many times subtle, sometimes not. I have realized though that the sounds and noises are a special part of a place and I have vivid memories and feelings towards the sounds of my home like the tree katydids and bullfrogs of the summer, the rustling leaves and wind in the bare trees of late fall, and the quietness and stillness of snow falling in the winter-many of which become background noises and maybe aren’t taken notice of.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Dec

06

Thor: Long May He Live!

Grayson P. Huston, B watch, Sailing Intern, UC Berkeley and SEA C-259 Alum
Oceans & Climate

It was a warm December morning aboard mama Cramer. The sun was shining, the waves were rolling, and the flying fish were fleeing for their lives away from what must have appeared to be a monstrosity for them, but for us, is a wonderful floating home. It was on this morning that I stood on the starboard side of the deck, clipped into the railing for safety, dip net in hand, poised like a Poseidon himself and gazing out into the horizon.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Dec

05

Sun Kissed & Salty!

Eben Kopp, C Watch, Bowdoin College
Oceans & Climate

Hello from half way across the ocean. Today was our third field day aboard the Cramer and let me tell you.. she is looking ship shape! Field day is such a fun, exciting, and enjoyable way to give back to the ship that gives us so much. If there is one thing I’ll miss most about this experience, it will certainly be the excessive cleaning of the ship on a daily and weekly basis.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Dec

04

Musings on sleep, science and sailing

Katarina Rolf, A Watch, Sailing Intern
Oceans & Climate

By popular demand - or final resort, really - I have been elected to write today’s blog about the goings-on of ship life and the like. This transatlantic voyage has been indescribably wonderful thus far. From catching and consuming flying fish to assisting with Sargassum wrangling to getting better at star fixes to running the Hunger Games on board, I don’t find myself with a whole lot of down time.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Dec

03

The Boat Makes Everything an Adventure!

Katie Lyon, B Watch, Sailing Intern
Oceans & Climate

Hello, everybody! Greetings from atop the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. We’re pretty much in the middle, now: halfway(ish) through the ocean, and halfway through our trip. We plot our position on a chart every hour, but it’s hard to get a conceptual sense of exactly how “in the middle of the ocean” we are.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (1) CommentsPermalink

Dec

02

Anticipating Researchers’ Ridge

Farley Miller | Kate Enright | Anna Yoors, Assistant Scientist | Assistant Steward/Geology Morale Nerd | Sailing Intern
Oceans & Climate

We make our way towards Researchers’ Ridge, a seamount sprouting out of the mid-Atlantic ridge coming to within 420 meters of the surface. The hope is to be able to follow up on the deployments of last year’s C-256 and gather sediment samples from the seamount with our sediment scoop. A clever contraption called a Shipek Grab, it consists of two semi-circles, one of which, when cocked, nests inside the other, held in place by two large coil springs

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topic: c263 • (1) CommentsPermalink
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