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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: c259


May

05

Bermudan Paradise

Mareike Duffing Romero, C watch, Humboldt State University
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Hello to our friends, family and anyone else who is tracking the adventures of C-259.

It has been 3 days into our first stop in Bermuda and let me tell you, it is paradise. The country is full of amiable people, constantly greeting us with a “Good morning or good afternoon”, giving us directions around the small town of St. George. Their open arms have made us feel at home in the different corners of the town, including the beaches, the coffee shops, the restaurants and the town center.

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May

04

Island Science and Sun Tans

Sarah Stratton, B Watch, Oberlin College
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Day 2 in Bermuda and it still feels strange being stationary. I got out of my bunk this morning and habitually braced myself against the wall, expecting the rolling and pitching that I’ve gotten used to these last two weeks. Instead, all was calm, and I was able to maneuver down the hallway without stumbling or running into anything! Very exciting.

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May

03

Port Call- Bermuda!

Helena McMonagle, A Watch, Wellesley College
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

At this very moment, I’m sitting up on deck on night watch with Kata, one of my trusty A-Watch shipmates. But standing watch tonight is unlike any other so far. The deck is no longer rocking and rolling beneath us. White caps no longer crash into the hull beside us. Our bow is no longer pitching into twelve foot swells ahead of us. The sails are no longer filling in the wind above us. In fact, this watch, there are no sails to haul, no passing ships to lookout for, no course to plot, no helm to steer.

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May

02

The Sunset’s Bearing

Sabrina Hutchinson, C- Watch, Hawai'i Pacific University
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

LAND HO!
I can’t believe we’re already almost halfway done with our sea component. The past two weeks have been absolutely phenomenal - we have all gained so much knowledge in such little time. From the nautical science aspect of our studies we have mastered (for the most part) the ship’s lines, how to steer “Mama Cramer”, and celestial navigation. In the scientific research department we have all completed our lab practicals, proving to the assistant scientists that we understand how to deploy our scientific instruments, process the data, and properly label and log everything that happens in the lab.

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May

01

Ramblings of an Intern

Robert Barlow, Intern, Archimedes Aerospace LLC, Montpelier High School
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

How does one convey the qualities of the Sargasso sea? Words form a structure with gaps for the imagination to fill, but one’s imagination can’t be skewed far enough in the right direction, nor can one’s uneducated mind truly articulate the sea. A picture conveys an instance in time, but to convey an instance in time of the sea is akin to handing someone a shade of blue; certainly a part of the whole, but a little one at that.

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Apr

30

The Calm after the Storm

William Botta, B Watch, University of Rhode Island
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Ahoy landlubbers and all of you wonderful people interested in SEA Semester Class C-259! Today started out slow but then started to grow! We’d spent the previous 24 hours hove to, where we set sails such that our lovely Cramer does a very slow zigzag in the ocean without really moving forward. It’s a great way to put on the brakes in order to avoid the rough weather surrounding Bermuda and the rough winds and seas that have been giving us a hard time as of late.

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Apr

29

Another blustery day on the Cramer

Caroline Graham, C Watch, Grinnell College
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Hello to all friends, family, and anyone else that may be reading this blog!

It has been another eventful 24 hours on the Corwith Cramer. We’ve seen some squally weather and some massive swells in the past day. This boat is definitely rockin’, but I think I’ve finally got my sea legs. I took a poll of the ship and asked people to define the last 24 hours in one word. The responses I received: squally, wavy, swells, rocky, etc. A pretty accurate description. I would also add the word fun and a little silly as the swells and sleep deprivation are starting to make things pretty interesting around here.

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Apr

28

A Brilliant Line Chase

Hannah Freyer, A Watch, Colorado College
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Hello to all of you who are tracking C-259’s journey or looking back at this for wonderful memories.

Today we had the chance to test our knowledge as our watch groups competed against one another to prove who knew the Cramer’s lines the best.  There was an air of competition as B Team took the lead, followed by the frantic chanting of A and C teams as they guided their teammates with the commands “hot” and “cold”. The class activity concluded with a communal Congo line of celebration around the ship.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Marine Biodiversity & Conservation, • Topic: c259 • (2) CommentsPermalink

Apr

27

Smooth Seas Never Made a Skilled Sailor

Margaret Keefe, B Watch, Mt. Holyoke College
Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

Hello to all family, friends, loved ones, and anyone else who is tracking C-259’s journey through the Sargasso Sea!

The calm seas from the past couple days have turned, and we are currently experiencing our first squall complete, of course, with foul weather gear. Within the past 24 hours B-Watch, my watch, have watched the gentle 1-2 foot waves turn to 7-9 foot waves with swells up to 11 feet. These conditions have put our sail handling skills to the test as things become more high stakes, but never fear even these strong gusts don’t deter us from handling lines, counting Sargassum, and of course catching the occasional nap!

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Apr

26

Observations from the Sargasso Sea

Dr. Robbie Smith, Bermuda Aquarium, Museum and Zoo, C-259 Visiting Scientist
MBC spring 2015

Hello to all the extended families and friends of the Corwith Cramer crew!

What a great feeling to be sailing again! After yet another beautiful night, lit by a half moon, the breeze returned early this morning and we have had a fantastic day of sailing. We have a strong breeze on our port quarter, with the seas building gradually, and Mama Cramer and her crew are loving it. This wind is pushing us in the right direction. Late this morning we crossed the 25th parallel and are truly deep in the Sargasso Sea.

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