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Current position of the SSV Robert C. Seamans. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers.

SEA Currents: SSV Robert C. Seamans


Mar

14

Fifth Time’s a Charm

Anna Cerf, A-Watch, Middlebury College
The Global Ocean

A-Watch practicing our jib-furling, preparing for our departure

Ship's Log

Current Location
Wellington, NZ

Ship’s Heading & Speed
Moored

Weather
Windy with low clouds

Souls on Board

Our final day in Wellington shaped up to be, for many of us, one of the best. People woke up still gushing about the film we saw last night, Hunt for the Wilderpeople. To anyone at home looking for a movie recommendation, definitely look into it.  The movie was particularly endearing to A-Watch as it featured haikus which have somehow become our main form of communication. Anyways, today, after free time this morning, our flock took the cable car up to the Botanic Gardens to visit the meteorologists at Met Weather. They taught us some basic weather concepts and gave the play-by-play of the past couple weeks' worth of weather. We were told that our less-than-ideal recent weather was the cost of the calm and clear weather that we began the trip with.

In the evening, a few of us ventured back up the cable car to visit the Space Place Observatory and Planetarium. It's hard to describe just how awesome the place was. We knocked around the museum before heading into the Planetarium where we lay back to watch a short film called "We Are Stars." The film took us on a journey from the big bang through star formation, nuclear fission, and onto evolution on Earth. As we watched, tons of details stood out as particularly incredible and ones I ought to remember. Not to get too meta for a study abroad blog post, but, as the title suggested, we are literally (the REAL literally!) made from stars. The atoms that construct us were created in the centers of stars long ago.

Looking ahead, tomorrow we will go for our fifth, and hopefully final, crossing of the Cook Strait.  There are plenty of "fun" things on board: swim calls, card games, being assistant steward, etc. However, I can say with relative certainty that no one here on board would put crossing Cook Strait in that category. We've been rocked a few times, now, and are eager to get the last time behind us. Perhaps we'll look back on crossing the Cook Strait as some kind of type-two fun that built our characters, but for now it's mostly just nausea-inducing.

To finish us off, here are some poems from fellow A-Watchers:

Sea nights are rough but
guiding stars glimmer, showing
the way through seas filled with spray.

Floating in the deep
reminded of our small place
in this spinning world.
-Elsbeth Pendleton-Wheeler

We are made of stars
just explosions in the sky
just some thoughts for sea

Do you enjoy space?
stars, galaxies and black holes
there's a lot out there
-Eileen O'Connor

- Anna

P.S.  Happy Birthday Jordan!!! Enjoy it and have a great rest of your week.

Categories: Robert C. Seamans,The Global Ocean: New Zealand, • Topics: s271  port stops  new zealand • (0) Comments
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