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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers.

SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer


Dec

12

Dominica, nous voila!

Danny Lucas, B Watch, Warren Wilson College
Oceans & Climate

Land at last, under a swizzle-light awning.

Ship's Log

Current Position
Portsmouth, Dominica

Ship’s Heading & Speed
Anchored

Sail Plan
Sails furled and covered

Weather
Sunny with occasional tropical rain showers

Souls on Board

So here we are, in Dominica!! All day we were within sight of land, getting closer and closer to our destination. The first contact I personally had with the Caribbean was hearing marine weather reports in French, broadcast from Martinique. I really wasn't expecting to hear familiar French after 29 days living on a tall ship in the middle of the ocean. We then met the smells of Dominica, a moist earthy tropical rain forest aroma. Shortly after, its mountains (tallest point of the Caribbean) towered before us as we crept our way into the Prince Rupert Bay.

We spent the rest of the day on the boat, getting it clean and tidied up before setting foot on land tomorrow. In the evening, everyone wore their nicest shirt and gathered on the quarterdeck, which was bright with string lights and Christmas decorations. We had a really nice meal with delicious meatloaf (which according to Kelsee is a mid-western thing, in case you didn't know). We then celebrated our Atlantic crossing with music, acts from A and C Watch, a poem reading, and to top it off: A CONTRADANCE. "Whaaaaat??!", you might say. But yes, we contra danced on a tall ship to our very own band in a Dominican bay. How awesome can this get???

After the festivities, everything got calm at once, as we had to change spots because our anchor was dragging. A few of us stayed on deck, playing guitar and relaxing in the dark.

We haven't set foot on land yet, and will do so tomorrow morning. Mixed feelings of excitement and pre-nostalgia are in the back of our minds as we are aware of the trip's soon ending. But for now, we are looking forward to the next three days in Dominica and sailing between Caribbean islands en route to Saint Croix!

- Danny

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Oceans & Climate, • Topics: c270  port stops  caribbean. • (3) Comments

Comments

Leave a note for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

#1. Posted by Jim Bowen on December 13, 2016

Thank you for another great update.  I so look forward to each and every update!


#2. Posted by Charlotte Lucas on December 13, 2016

Merci beaucoup pour ces bonnes nouvelles, Danny !  J’espère que vous avez pris plein de photos de votre soirée “pré-débarquement”.  C’était toi qui gérais le contra-dancing ?  Profite bien de DomiNIca (aren’t I something knowing how to pronounce it wink).

Love, Mom

P.S. Happy landing to the entire crew; you all deserve a change of pace!


#3. Posted by Devi on December 13, 2016

Danny and crew,
Congratulations on a good passage.  Dominica is a magical island with beautiful waterfalls, hikes and the most friendly people in the eastern Caribbean.  We spent many weeks in Prince Rupert Bay and it has poor holding- many a vessel has drug anchor in this bay.  If you need some one to show you the island Martin Carrierre is a good guy with vehicles and lots of knowledge. Don’t miss the vegetable market.Devi


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