• Like Sea Education Association on Facebook
  • Follow Sea Education Association on Twitter
  • Follow SEA Semester on Instagram
  • Watch Sea Education Association on YouTube
  • Read SEA Currents
  • Listen to SEA Stories
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar

Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers.

SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer


Nov

06

A beautiful day on the South Sargasso Sea

Isaiah Lineaweaver, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

3rd Scientist Grayson and 3rd Mate Lydia enjoy the gorgeous spectacle

Ship's Log

Position
21° 38.9’ N x 057° 01.9’ W

Description of location
South Sargasso Sea

Heading
190°

Speed
3 knots

Weather / Wind
Wind: E, beaufort force 3, Sea ExS 2ft, Sunny and warm and partly cloudy

Log
1695.1nm

Souls on Board

Greetings! Today was another beautiful day aboard the Corwith Cramer. It was partly cloudy but you could still feel the effects of the powerful sun. A sun hat and sunscreen were a good precaution to take. Today is a day that makes you happy to be alive and incredibly grateful to be doing what we are doing. You can't help but marvel at the vastness of the ocean and the magnitude of creatures and critters small and large that lurk beneath the surface.

There is nothing quite like being out on the ocean with no land in sight, being able to look in a full 360 degrees and see only the blue of the ocean and the blue of the sky and see them meet uninterrupted by land. This is a day for relaxation, a day for laying on top of the lab top or dog house and grabbing a book and reading until you fall asleep. A nap is inevitable with the hot sun and the slight rocking of the ship lulling you to sleep. Times like this make you wish you could never leave this moment and stay in the peaceful state forever. But of course we can't. There are miles to be made, sails to be set and struck, and most importantly the student crew has project deadlines slowly creeping up. It's great to see the students not backing down from the challenge and I am amazed at how much information they have learned and retained, and every day still eager to learn more. The past couple of days the student crew has been diligently working on their projects.  Morale continues to be high and there are nothing but smiles all around the boat. With science deployments going as planned and the weather being so perfect, it's impossible not to be happy.

I myself - not being a student but a sailing intern - can't express my gratitude for letting me be a part of this amazing organization. I had never sailed on a tall ship before and never traveled this far on the ocean, but it didn't take long for me to be hooked on this incredible world of boating. It took only a moment of sailing from Belfast, Maine to Woods Hole to know I wanted to pursue a career in tall ships. I can only say to anyone who is considering doing SEA Semester or a program like it, why not? Even if you are on the edge and are not sure, just do it. When you get far from land and set your first sail you will have no regrets, and like I said, why did I not do this sooner? I have learned copious things in only a short amount of time and the things I have learned make me hungry to learn more.

Mistakes were made and more will be made but it's all a part of the learning experience. It helps to have such a patient and knowledgeable professional crew to guide you through the steps. I can see why student alumni and others keep coming back year after year to work for SEA.

As I look out the library port hole I see the neuston net drag in the water and some fluffy cumulous clouds in the sky. I must sign off and go enjoy the rest of this beautiful day. Watch starts at 1300 and today I am lucky enough to work with the engineers Nate and Claire. I can't wait to see what interesting project they have in store for me today. To friends and family back home, I love you and I will see you soon, but not too soon. I'm enjoying myself too much.

Love,
Isaiah

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c275  life at sea  study abroad • (0) Comments
Previous entry: Tropics!    Next entry: Setting most of the sails on the Cramer

Comments

Leave a note for students and crew to read when they reach their next port and have access to the internet!

Name:

Email:

URL:

Add a comment:

Notify me of follow-­up comments?

I would like SEA to keep me informed about news and opportunities.