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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers.

SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer


Annabelle Leahy, A Watch, Carleton College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

What a day on the Cramer! This is about to be a long blog, but I deemed it necessary to try to capture all that this day had to offer, so stick with me. Though every day has its excitement here on board, today was something to remember. We spent the day in the Hudson Canyon, the largest submarine canyon along the US Atlantic Coast, rivaling the depth and scale of the Grand Canyon, just southeast of New York City.

We got the opportunity to participate in the New York Seascape program, a program working to connect New York residents to their nearby ocean.

May

20

Sarah Speroff, C Watch, Kenyon College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Growing up in Cleveland has made me someone who is not easily phased by sudden or unexpedcted changes in whether. I have often seen a week that included clear skies with warm sun, dark and looming thunderstorms, sudden hail, snow flurries, and a mild tornado. But today I experienced the true North Atlantic Ocean, full of sun, squalls, freezing winds, and waves that engulfed our floating home. C watch took the deck at 0645 in the morning, all decked out in our endless layers of warmth and full foulie garb, ready for the frigid morning ahead.

Kelly Gunthorpe, Chief Engineer
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Greetings all,

As the Corwith Cramer’s engineer I’d like to invite you all to follow along and catch a glimpse into an average day taking care of our little floating community.

First things first, upon waking up in the morning I take a stroll around the engine room to make sure everything is operating as it should be.

Ridge Pierce, A Watch, Roger Williams University
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Today was another exciting day aboard the Cramer! I woke up this morning and had some extra delicious blueberry muffins for breakfast. I had morning watch this morning and today I was finally in lab, the first time since leaving Bermuda. Usually when I enter the lab, I always glance to the little shelf near the port side porthole where the cool specimens from the previous evening’s science station are kept so everyone can see them. I was especially excited once I walked into the lab this morning because I saw a creature that I didn’t even know existed- a Paper Nautilus.

Madison Lichak, A Watch, Barnard College
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

We are sailing once again. Leaving Bermuda was a bittersweet and strange experience. It is hard to describe the feeling of seeing an entire country fade into the horizon as our ship moved further and further into an ever-encompassing cerulean sea. What seemed like an immense and bustling country suddenly lost its grandeur as it shrunk to non-existence behind us. Out here, everything seems both monumental and minuscule.

Kata Rolf, Labhand, C-259 Alumna
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

My days onboard are more or less the same; at 0600 I get a wakeup for breakfast, which I inevitably ignore until 0700 when the second seating of breakfast is served. I’ll wander around haphazardly until 1000, when the ship goes hove to for morning station. I get my dipnet, my buckets, the saltwater hose and begin staring out at the sea for the next two hours, hoping to catch a glimpse of tiny spots of gold flecked among the vast expanses of blue water.

Callie Bateson, B Watch, Sailing Intern
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Hello land-dwellers!

You have heard about the experiences from all of the students so now I’m going to give you my experience from the perspective of a staff member here aboard the Cramer.

When I told my friends and family that I was going to live on a boat for six weeks back in 2014 they thought I was crazy.

Mark Howard Long, Ph. D., Associate Professor, History & Social Science
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

Dear loyal readers,

After almost a week of field trips in Bermuda we are now making our way home. One of the aspects of teaching at SEA Semester that I find most rewarding is the way that we routinely examine the intersections between history, policy, science and exploration, all in an inter-/multi- disciplinary setting. Our time in Bermuda this week was spent investigating how all of these threads come together in this unique part of the world.

Anna Brodmerkel, B Watch, UNC Chapel Hill
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

After a week in Bermuda, Mama Cramer is back out to sea and we are headed to New York! This morning we had all hands on deck helping to prepare the ship before we left Bermuda. We made quite a mess during the port call, especially with all the dock lines out from yesterday, and it was time to clean, clean, clean! I felt like I was cleaning my house before leaving for vacation; there was sweeping, mopping, and scrubbing, along with coiling, hanging, and furling.

Megs Malpani, Starboard Watch, Brown University
Marine Biodiversity & Conservation

What a beautiful last day in Port! Unfortunately, the ferry to the dockyard was canceled due to gale force winds (Force 8), so we had to improvise for the class field trip. Instead, Mark, gave us a quick walking tour of St. Georges, discussing its history of maritime culture. We learned about Bermuda’s role in trade and got to visit the St George’s museum (a world heritage site).

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