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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers.

SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer


William Corson, Skidmore College
Transatlantic Crossing

Hello readers!

Eight days. Eight days until we have crossed this beautiful ocean. Eight days until we reach the beautiful land of Ireland. Eight days until we depart from our friends. Eight days before everyone aboard this ship that has been our home for a month is left with bitter sweet emotions of both expansion and loss.

Ian Kasaitis, McDaniel College
Transatlantic Crossing

Hey Land Lovers!

Nine days left until we reach the pot of gold called Ireland.  It seems like everyone has hit their stride, especially considering we are now ready to be JWOs and JLO’s (Junior and Lab watch officers). Today I was Junior Lab officer, it was a completely different rhythm from being shadow, but I feel like I am starting to learn what being a leader is all about.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: c267  mega  science  leadership • (1) CommentsPermalink
Brianna Cahill, Stony Brook University
Transatlantic Crossing

Hello everyone!

Today was quite the day here on the SSV Corwith Cramer filled with laughs, smiles and an abundance of delicious food! I started my day off waking up early to Meg ringing the breakfast bell and saying “IT’S BAGEL DAY,” to which I promptly hopped out of bed, heading straight for the main salon. Our wonderful steward, Bex had crafted fresh bagels for the morning, amongst many other glorious meals crafted to delicious perfection.

Nina Whittaker, Sailing Intern, Kenyon College
Transatlantic Crossing

With all of the bustle of weather and watch and work, it seems strange to think about the slow moments, the pause moments. These elusive patches of time ripple through each day, but come together on Sundays, the day of rest at sea just as much as on land. Although watch schedules continue as usual, there is no class, and peaceful swathes of time drift by for laundry and sleep and talk.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: c267  life at sea • (0) CommentsPermalink
Mary Christman, St. John’s College
Transatlantic Crossing

Hello everyone!

It was a busy day as always here on the Cramer! We spent the day feeling the effects of a pretty big low pressure system passing to the north of us. This meant that the dawn watch (C watch) had strong wind, rain, and some big swells this morning. It sounds like they had quite the exhilarating experience striking the jib! When turnover came around and my watch (A watch) came on at 0700 the sky was still overcast and we were still seeing swells as big as 15 feet.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: c267  life at sea • (2) CommentsPermalink
Courtney Moore, Sailing Intern, Sewanee
Transatlantic Crossing

Phase One
With seas grown high and wind a-blowin’
There’s no place that we’re a goin’
‘Heave to’ they say and ‘hunker down’
To study lest you wear a frown
When the practicals occur
But with no shipmate you confer.
Study ropes and knots and lines
In order that your pin you’ll find;

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: c267  life at sea • (1) CommentsPermalink
SEA Semester

SEA Semester in the News
SEA Semester: students set sail to Ireland
By Sasha Nyary

This June, two Mount Holyoke College students joined 13 other undergraduates on a transatlantic voyage aboard the SEA Semester tall ship, SSV Corwith Cramer, a 134-foot brigantine. Molly Lapointe ’17 is a French major, and Kate Armstrong ’19 intends to major in environmental studies.

The ship departed Woods Hole, Massachusetts, on June 3 and will arrive in Cork, Ireland, on June 30. During the crossing, Lapointe and Armstrong are conducting oceanographic research, honing their sailing skills, and cultivating leadership and management skills, all for academic credit.

Read the full story.

Categories: News,Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: None • (0) CommentsPermalink
Kaylie Plumb, University of South Carolina
Transatlantic Crossing

Greetings Land Lubbers,

Today has been a wonderful day for sailing! The seas have been low, the current is in our favor, and the sun has come out to help dry our laundry on the bow. We had another spectacular dolphin sighting this morning followed by a whale sighting from B watch up on the main mast. Other exciting news on the ship is that we have reached the halfway point of our journey!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: c267  megafauna • (7) CommentsPermalink
Allisa Dalpe, Sailing Intern, Connecticut College
Transatlantic Crossing

After the dawn watch (0100-0700) and evening watch (1900-0100) combo of yesterday, I think B watch enjoyed our day to sleep in today. We awoke to cold, foggy weather, although the rain has let up from last night’s downpours. Starting the day off with an entertaining B watch meeting with mate Scott and assistant scientist Erin helped lighten the mood. We have only known each other for about 11 days now, but when living together in tight spaces and twenty-four hours a day, personalities come out and it feels like we have known each other for much, much longer.

Kiara Reed, Colby College
Transatlantic Crossing

Today marks the start of data analysis for each Practical Oceanographic Research group. Nets have been sent out daily to collect phytoplankton on the surface of the ocean. These samples have accumulated over the days and our assistant scientists have turned the task of assigning meaning to this conglomerate of tiny plants over to us.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Transatlantic Crossing, • Topics: c267  science  research • (1) CommentsPermalink
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