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Current position of the SSV Corwith Cramer. Click on the vessel to view position history. Use the tools, top right, to change the map style or view data layers.

SEA Currents: SSV Corwith Cramer


Erin Cody, Burlington High School
Ocean Exploration

Out in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, Domino’s pizza delivery does not exist. Thinking of civilization back on land is weird. The concept of green pine trees lurk into my mind and then the reminder that I very well may be greeted with snow when I return stuns me, forgetting that was still a thing. As I stand bow-watch and gaze into the dark twilight of the night, I try to recall my life before this. No routine, no set schedule, no meal times, no daily clean/field days and no wake ups.

Erik Shook, University of Tulsa
Ocean Exploration

I could tell you your life is fine the way it is. I could tell you the niche you’ve found for yourself within society is all you need. The sounds of the city, suburbia, and the chatter you hear at work every day is enough. I could tell you these things but then I would be a liar. It is a fool’s errand to attempt a description worthy of life at sea.

Tim Patrick, 2nd Mate
Ocean Exploration

Change is in the air. Whether our crew knows it or not, they have come a long way from Woods Hole and I am not counting the sea miles. I see it in our crew everyday as they begin stepping up to the plate. I remember their green faces as we set out around Martha’s Vineyard and powered south to get past the Gulf Stream. Every face expressed the same perplexed look during those first few days of remaining hove-to; “is it ALWAYS like this” as the ship pitched to and fro!

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c275  sailing  study abroad • (1) CommentsPermalink
Chris Coulouvatos, Hamilton College
Ocean Exploration

Hello everyone! Today was a special day.  During the night while most of the ship was sleeping and only the dawn watch was up we moved from the south Sargasso Sea to the transition zone. The transition zone is in between the south Sargasso sea and the Tropics. That means that we moved one step closer to our destination, Grenada. As we are moving south the weather is getting hotter and hotter. On deck the sun is burning especially for morning and afternoon watch but when it’s windy you can’t feel the heat.

Isaiah Lineaweaver, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

Greetings! Today was another beautiful day aboard the Corwith Cramer, it was partly cloudy but you could still feel the effects of the powerful sun, a sun hat and sunscreen were a good precaution to take. Today is a day that makes you happy to be alive and incredibly grateful to be doing what we are. You can’t help but marvel at the vastness of the ocean and the magnitude of creatures and critters small and large that lurk beneath the surface.

Nov

05

Gabo Page, 1st assistant scientist
Ocean Exploration

Welcome to the tropics! On this fifth of November the Cramer and her crew crossed the Tropic of Cancer, this invisible line circling the globe at 23° 30’ N. This event (celebrated by as many aloha shirts as I could encourage people to wear) was one I was looking forward to for some time, and this for a few reasons.

Nov

04

Jesse Whitney, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

Ahoy readers of the Cramer blog,

Today was another Field day. That means that we all had a chance to scrub, shine, wipe, sweep, and swiff! There was plenty of grit and grime (Mung) to keep us busy for a couple of hours! Cookware came out of the Galley for a good scrubbin’, settee cushions up to the deck for a shinin’, overheads and bulkheads wiped, Soles swept n’ swiffered!

Hanqing Wu, C-Watch, Boston University
Ocean Exploration

Greetings from the SSV Corwith Cramer Steward Assistant,

Today might be an ordinary day for everyone, but I feel quite special because I am the Steward, which means I can take a break from my sailing training and any other on deck duties. There is more night sleeping time for the Steward’s Assistant because usually for dawn watch everyone needs to wake up at 12:30am while the Steward Assistant can sleep until 4am.

Rachel Hemond, B Watch, Middlebury College.
Ocean Exploration

Somehow, dawn watch always arrives sooner than you think: the 0030 wake-up call, the red lights that preserve our night vision below decks, the bowl of midrats (midnight snack) to grab from before we stumble out onto the deck. The cool early-morning air and the endless expanse of stars above us brings us more fully into wakefulness, though cups of coffee clutched in sleep-heavy hands may also help.

Jack Rozen, A-Watch, Tulane
Ocean Exploration

Dear Family and Friends,

First of all, I would like to start by explaining how surreal this experience truly is. With seasickness long gone, we can now experience and understand the wonders of the sea. The ability to walk on deck at any hour of the day and see nothing but deep blue sea and perfectly clear horizon is an incredible unprecedented experience for me. With no light pollution for hundreds of miles, you are able to see everything from ships in the far distance to a perfect celestial sphere in the night sky.

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