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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: The Global Ocean: New Zealand


Craig Marin, Maritime Studies Faculty
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The program “Ocean Exploration, Caribbean,” C-251, has now begun.  Thirteen students from ten different American colleges and schools have boarded the Corwith Cramer and have started their orientation for life aboard a tall ship—their “sea component.”  Some students arrived in San Juan a number of days ago with friends and family and have begun the “port stop” exploration that will be an integral part of the program.  The sixteenth-century walled city of Old San Juan will provide an excellent starting point for comparing and contrasting the histories, cultures and economies of the Caribbean island nations we visit.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  port stops  puerto rico • (0) CommentsPermalink

Shoshana Moriarty, B Watch, University of Massachusetts Amherst
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It may not feel like February here in the tropics, but students and crew awoke this morning eager to celebrate Valentines Day the Bobby C way. Earlier in the week we randomly chose Valentines-Secret Santa style-to make cards, poems, or gifts for. With the help of the craft drawer in the main salon where we eat meals, students and crew made everything from funny poems and sweet letters to a handmade bracelet. In such close quarters, it was hard to keep a secret, but everyone had fun discovering personalized valentines in their bunks this afternoon.


Taylor Hogan, B Watch, Northeastern University
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Its 0851, and Ive already been awake for many more hours than I would be if I were still a landlubber. I collapsed into my bunk last night after mid watch (from 2300 to 0300), and spent about three seconds lying awake before the rocking of the ship and the exhaustion of a day of sailing tossed me into dreamland. And oh, did the ship rock! Yesterday afternoon we turned on the main engine to motorsail closer to the wind, which is coming from the direction we need to go needless to say, thats not exactly ideal for sailing.


Melissa Paddock, B watch, Assistant Scientist
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After spending a full three days underway, it appears that many aboard are starting to get their sea-legs as well as, for some, lose the light green pallor in their skin.  The wind is picking up, and as you can read from the
previous blogs, we’re getting more and more comfortable setting sails, especially the four lowers.  It’s beginning to appear as though we’re taking some semblance of sailors!

Aside from sail handling, one of the most important aspects of sailing is also learning the lines of the sails!


Charlotte Bloom, A Watch
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After being underway for two and a half days, and sailing for a good amount of time, we are gaining more and more knowledge on sail handling. Words like “make fast the jib sheet” and “that’s well” seem a lot less intimidating. “Making fast” a line means to fasten it to a pin in a specific way. “That’‘s well” means a line has been adjusted just perfectly, and to stop what you’‘re doing to the line. There really could be a whole dictionary made of sailing terms, those are just two of them! Coiling lines clockwise and walking on the windward side are quickly becoming second nature. And trust me that was not the case a week ago. If one thing is true, sailing has a huge learning curve.


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The students of C-251, Ocean Exploration, will arrive in San Juan, Puerto Rico to board the SSV Corwith Cramer by Friday, February 14th. They will end their voyage in St. Croix around Monday, March 24th.

Categories: Corwith Cramer,Ocean Exploration, • Topics: c251  ships company • (0) CommentsPermalink

Matt Gauthier, C Watch, Davidson College
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Today has been our first full day of sailing since departing Fakarava. Although some of us are still dealing with seasickness, we all have quickly returned to the routines of life at sea. The watch schedule is in full effect and things have gone off without a hitch. For those who may not know how the watch schedule works, it really is quite simple once you get used to it. There are 5 watches throughout the day: 2 six-hour watches during the day and 3 four-hour watches at night. We are divided into 3 watch groups – A, B, and C – each with a mate and scientist, and rotate through the watch schedule. For example, C watch had dawn watch this morning (0300-0700), will have evening watch tonight (1900-2300), morning watch tomorrow (0700-1300), and so on.


Lauren Barber, A Watch,University of Connecticut
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After a full four days of adventure and fun in Fakarava, we are underway and headed to our next destination, Nuka Hiva, which is approximately 530 nautical miles away! We are planning on around a 5-day sail. Although the seasickness has returned to some, me included, we all still seem to be extremely excited to be underway and headed to our next island destination.

Today we had our first Field Day to combat all of the Mung on board the Seamans! Mung, as defined by our Chief Mate Sarah, is the grime that is neither a solid nor a liquid, and can seep into the cracks and corners of practically every square inch of the ship.


Brianna Coughlin, A watch, Saint Michael’s College
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Our last full day on Fakarava was spent boating to the Southern pass and snorkeling among beautiful coral reefs. We began the day at 0800 with three local guides picking us up at Robert C. Seamans in their motorboats. Our ship is anchored near the northern pass and our goal for the day was to reach the southern pass—30 nautical miles away. Fakarava is essentially a giant rectangle with two passes and a calm lagoon in the middle. It’s difficult to grasp the scale of the atoll because when you’re standing on land facing the lagoon area you aren’t able to see the other side of the atoll.


Anna Finkenauer, C Watch, University of Vermont
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Another day ashore on the beautiful atoll of Fakarava!  Today we were up bright and early to make our way to shore for a busy day of learning, sightseeing and fun. Our first stop of the day was Lulu, a pearl farm. Here we got to see how oysters are harvested and their pearls extracted. It was amazing to see the famous French Polynesian black pearls coming straight out of live oysters.

Next up was a visit to Yvonne, a sustainable farm on the ocean side (outer rim) of the island.


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