• Like Sea Education Association on Facebook
  • Follow Sea Education Association on Twitter
  • Follow SEA Semester on Instagram
  • Watch Sea Education Association on YouTube
  • Read SEA Currents
  • Listen to SEA Stories
  • View SEA Semester campus visit calendar
Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: Nov 2017


Isaac Vandor, B Watch, Olin College of Engineering
The Global Ocean

Our first full day at sea! Waking up to a gorgeous sunrise at anchor this morning, we set the sails and continued towards Russell. Throughout the day, we’ve been rotating watches focusing on applying all of our newfound skills in navigating, plotting courses, and catnaps. Around 1400, all hands gathered for our first actual class of the voyage. We discussed our current position (roughly 60 nautical miles North of Auckland), sail plan, and weather forecast before diving into sail handling 2.0.


Nov

16

Gabo Page, 1st scientist
Ocean Exploration

What a different way to wake up for the crew of the Corwith Cramer this morning. Drawn from its slumber by Rachel’s singing voice, the entire ship’s company got a wake up at once - something unheard of underway when an entire watch is awake and working at any given time. New sights and sounds greeted the early risers as they stepped onto deck: a risen sun behind a verdant hill dotted with houses, high frigates already soaring in the air, a barking dog, stately pelicans grazing the flat water surface with their wingtips.


Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu
SEA Semester

SEA Alum Meghan Jeans Brings Multidisciplinary Approach to SEA

As a biology major turned lawyer, Meghan Jeans (W-144) has been working across disciplines, geographies and issues areas to build bridges throughout her career.  She brings that approach to SEA this fall as a visiting faculty member for Class C-276, Caribbean Reef Expedition.

According to Meghan, a multi-disciplinary approach is critical to both solving problems and preparing students for the real world.  She says it’s an approach that’s been critical in her own work. “I use my science training to inform and inspire the implementation of market-based and policy solutions to marine conservation challenges.” Whether stimulating public-private partnerships in support of conservation, building capacity within communities to manage resources sustainably, collaborating with researchers and resource managers to translate science into action, or working with decision makers to enact meaningful policy reforms, her multidisciplinary background has proven to be an asset.


Jan Witting, Meghan Jeans and Robby Fidler, CRE Grenada teaching team
Caribbean Reef Expedition

After a brief five-day break, the Caribbean Reef Expedition students are back together! The next chapter of our voyage has just barely begun as we gathered at our new island home, the True Blue Bay Resort in True Blue, Grenada. This will be our base as we set about exploring the reefs and the landscapes of this beautiful island in a series of field trips in buses, and in boats, in shoes, and in fins.


Rudy Schreiber, C Watch, University of the Arts
The Global Ocean

Bon Voyage, land!

We started my day with breakfast then chores. My watch was in charge of scrubbing the deck (I’ve been calling it the poop deck until someone tells me that it is not the poop deck). After chores we were released to do our independent study. Caleb, Will, and my project for Sense of Place, are to observe and document the taskscape of Mount Eden, Auckland’s tallest dormant volcanoes.


Farley Miller, 2nd Assistant Scientist
Ocean Exploration

In the words of Anna yesterday, “Here we are.” This evening, however, that phrase has a whole new meaning, and we aboard have the firmest sense of where we are yet. Land! Sighted early this morning as distant flickering lights 38 nm away, then rising out of the gloaming as the sun comes up and gives us colors to behold; then we are between two islands and in the lee and the smell of the land is overwhelming. Wet dirt, fresh wood smoke and an entirely new array of ocean smells not encountered in the open ocean.


Ann Robinson, A Watch, Sewanee: The University of the South
The Global Ocean

After a night spent rotating through night watches for the first time, we woke bright and early for breakfast and emergency situation trainings. We rotated through fire, man overboard, and abandon ship practices and succeeded in rescuing Gilbert, our rugby ball, from a cold dip. Around 11, despite the drizzle, we set off for the Auckland War Memorial Museum. After exploring Albert Park, the University of Auckland, and the Auckland Domain, and learning some of their history, we were set loose to roam the museum.


Anna Wietelman, A Watch, Sailing Intern
Ocean Exploration

“SO, here we are, running before the wind under the topsail and course…” Jesse, sailing intern and current C watch J-WO says to A watch clustered around him on the quarterdeck. His voice comes from a silhouette plastered against a backdrop of stars. “The wind is from the East, force 4. Course ordered is 300 degrees….” he continues. And so began last night’s evening watch.


SEA Semester

Tom Haller of Colorado College describes what he is looking forward to as he and his shipmates get ready to head to the Caribbean and SSV Corwith Cramer.


Will Bahr, Oberlin College
The Global Ocean

Greetings, folks,

The first real day aboard the Robert C. Seamans unfurled before us like a jib (definition impending). We woke, we ate, we leapt right into the life of salty doggery that we’ll be living for the next six weeks. We rotated by watches (students divided into teams to both guide and monitor the ship throughout all hours of the day/night), each of which learned a smorgasbord of tasks, including jib furling (the ship’s front-most sail), various science-gear deployment and the nuanced art of deck scrubbing.


Page 1 of 3 pages  1 2 3 >