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Sea Education Association | SEA Currents

SEA Currents: Jul 2017


Katarina Zahedi & Nadia Diskin-Gaudette, Milton Academy & Boston Latin School
SEA Semester

Hello world. Welcome to the first and final edition of Katarina and Nadia’s blog.

Today we woke up to a delicious breakfast of eggs, potatoes, and pineapples (Katarina really likes pineapples, while Nadia did not eat any. She prefers potatoes). It was lively and loud as usual in B House because B house is best house, whereas in C House it was peaceful and quiet.

Categories: SEASCape, • Topics: seascape2  life on shore  research  marine biodiversity • (0) CommentsPermalink

Franklina Yeboah, University of Maryland Eastern Shore
SEA Semester

The course section of the Partnership Education Program (PEP) is over and I have transitioned full-time into the lab at Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystem Lab for my research on Sea turtles with Maureen Conte (MBL) and Heather Hass (NOAA). The course section was hard-work but I was able to push through it. I started working on my research on July 5, 2017 and so far I am having the most fun and learning new things that I never thought of.


Jul

31

Isaac Carroo, B Watch, Rice University
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Watching my conceptions of space change as I have spent the past three and a half weeks onboard the Robert C. Seamans has been interesting to say the least. In the beginning, I felt that my world would inevitably shrink down to a mere fraction of what it used to be, in many ways. There is the obvious physical constraint of having only 140 feet of space to walk up and down on any given day, but there was also the fact that my spheres of interaction were minimized to the 37 others on board with me and, for a few days, the people of Kanton.


Allison Gaydeski & Stephanie Kuplast, Northfield High School & Keystone School
SEA Semester

Today was a relaxing, beautiful morning- we had the latest wake up call yet (8:45), so we could wake up a bit earlier and drink some tea, or sleep in. We had a delicious breakfast of French Toast and sausages with maple syrup, thank you very much Sabrina!

Categories: SEASCape, • Topics: seascape2  life on shore • (0) CommentsPermalink

Janet Bering, 2nd Assistant Scientist
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Just now, I went around and asked the staff if they had one sentence to share with the outside world.

Here is what they had to say to you, the dearest outside world:


Nic Rummel, C Watch, Colorado School of Mines
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

Hello all ye land lovers. Things are going well for us out here in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. We have had a good last few days with our fair share of scientific deployments and sail handling. It has been a particular pleasure of mine to finally participate in the full work load. At first, I had an unfortunately severe amount of complications from sea sickness. guess that is what a mountain man gets for trying to be a sailor.


Nicole Capozzi & Gayatri Singla, Pingree High School & Head-Royce School
SEA Semester

We awoke this morning at 6:45 (or 5:50 to those of us that shower in the morning and have to share a bathroom with 7 other people) to the fabulous smell of breakfast sandwiches and coffee. After breakfast (thanks Sabrina!), we journeyed to the Madden Center, pumped for the morning beach cleanup. Upon our arrival, we entered the lecture hall to the startling news that we happened to be 30 minutes early (I could have slept until 6:20), and that we had an hour long lecture before we went to the beach.

Categories: SEASCape, • Topics: seascape2  life on shore • (1) CommentsPermalink

Carlos Rivero, Amherst College
SEA Semester

Despite all the research and social experiences I’ve had as part of the PEP program so far, the past couple of days of being in the program have me setting my sights beyond this summer and even beyond graduating college. Several days ago we took the time to attend a panel of WHOI graduate students working on their doctorates, to hear what they had to say about preparing for graduate school.


Kate Benson, A Watch, Stetson University
Protecting the Phoenix Islands

After a particularly damp and dreary night watch, I thought I’d spend a few minutes sharing my newly acquired nuggets of wisdom on…

Life Lessons Learned on Night Watch: Tips and Tricks for Surviving 7pm to 1am

- Memorize the lines before dark – Knowing which ropes to haul or ease is imperative for smooth sailing. If you don’t know which line is which when you can see them, imagine how much harder it is when you can’t. Memorize your lines before the sun goes down.


Ashwin Padaki and Sam Brandt, Lexington High School and Princeton High School
SEA Semester

It was a relief having to wake up at 7:30 today, as we had significantly earlier wake-ups the previous two days. We had cereal for breakfast, and in general, the morning was calm. We attended a drawing session conducted by Victoria Smith, the SEA alumni relations coordinator, in which we practiced natural history sketches. We practiced different styles, such as blind contour drawings, line contour drawings, and timed gestures. It was refreshing to have a less stressful morning than the previous two.

Categories: SEASCape, • Topics: seascape2  life on shore • (0) CommentsPermalink

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