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Voyages

SSV Corwith Cramer Blog

The SSV Corwith Cramer will depart St. Croix on November 28th with students from class C232. They plan to sail in Caribbean waters before concluding their voyage in Key West on December 21st.

Position information is updated on a workday basis only. Audio updates from the ship are reported periodically throughout the voyage.

Dec

20

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: Alongside, Trumbo Point Annex, Pier D-1, Key West, FL
  • Current Weather: Winds North, Force 3
  • This morning, the ship cast her mooring lines ashore in Key West in a brisk north wind that sent folks diving into bunks after long forgotten outerwear. Bulky pelicans flew by on their way to work in ragged single file, glancing our way long enough to recognize that we hadn't come here to fish and therefore weren't worth their time.

    Once alongside, students and crew in wool hats and fleece sweaters worked through the routine of an arrival day, stowing gear, re-furling sails, and taking the ship apart for cleaning in a way that's just not possible at sea. The day concluded with a barbecue, (another activity that's best tried close to land) followed by a gathering on the quarterdeck. There were songs, silly awards, and discussions of tomorrow's departure. Everyone was startled to realize that it was the first time since sailing that everyone on the ship had been together for a meal.

    It's been a great voyage, happy and productive thanks to the hard work, flexibility, and good humor of all who participated. And I think that most are a bit sorry to be starting the transition back to land so soon. As a going away present, the sky has arranged for a lunar eclipse tonight, there to see for anyone with warm socks and a willingness to get up voluntarily at 0200. We'll see.

    Captain Elliot Rappaport

Dec

19

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: Position: 24°16.6'N x 083°15.6'W Speed: 6 knots Course: 088° T
  • Current Weather: Maximum Current: 3 knots
  • Today, December 19, marks my 69th consecutive day aboard Cramer. While some folks may find this shocking, I can say with certainty that it's still pretty awesome. Today we managed to see not one but three things that in all those days I haven't seen in some time: a truly spectacular sunrise, heavy commercial shipping traffic, and large mats of floating Sargassum. Even in the weeks on the journey from Woods Hole, passing through the Sargasso Sea, we failed to spot the famed but elusive mats of Sargassum stretching as far as the eye can see. But this morning—here they are! As for that heavy commercial shipping traffic, it can only indicate one thing—we are in one mighty strong current! That's right, here we are in the Florida Current approaching the Gulf Stream, the fastest current in the world (clocking in at around 4 knots). While Cramer gets carried by this phenomenon "home" to Key West, shipping traffic from all over the world hops into this fast lane for a speedier journey too. But wait! Let's slow down and do a Neuston tow real quick...

    Don't worry, world, we'll be back soon. Love to my other family, waiting patiently for my return. Erin Roach (1st Scientist)

Dec

18

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 23° 42.2'N x 084° 52.1'W, Steering 042° True
  • Current Weather: Winds NW, Beaufort Force 4
  • Today B watch started the day with a meeting aloft in the rigging. Once aloft, my normal fear of heights was overcome by the panoramic view of the ocean surrounding me. Our afternoon watch started off with a lot of sail handling for the first hour. Afterwards, the remaining hours consisted of smooth sailing, a photogenic dove stopping off for a rest, another colorful sunset, and finished off with chants of "USA, USA" as we returned to US waters after 21 days away. With about 133 nautical miles left to Key West, tomorrow will be the last full day of sailing.

    Our time here has flown by, and with the end of the trip approaching, I find myself looking back to the day we boarded the Corwith Cramer in St. Croix, not really knowing what to expect out of the next three and a half weeks. With the exception of weekly cleaning marathons, ("field days") ipods have been replaced by singing. Social networking consists of which dinner table you decide to sit at, or who you run into while on a boat check. Maybe we won’t miss dawn/galley clean up so much, but come next semester in Boston, we'll surely miss classes on the quarterdeck, and looking up at night to see almost every star in the sky. Between physics class and statistics, we can recall watching dolphins off the bow, swimming amidst streaks of bioluminescence, and the countless other unique experiences we have had on this trip.

    Sending love to all of our family and friends. See you soon! -B watch (Laura, Cristina (superuvita is on his way home), Kristin, Tim)

Dec

17

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 23° 07'N x 085° 19'W, 2 kts, 298°T.
  • Current Weather: SE wind, Beaufort Force 4, 3 ft seas.
  • We are through the Yucatan Strait, rounding Cuba, on our way to Key West. This afternoon the wind and seas moderated just enough for us to gather on deck for poster presentations of our research. We dressed in our finest, engaged in discussion about our project results, and savored homemade soft pretzels for snack.

Dec

16

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: # 21°02'N x 084°45'W, 5kts, 345° T
  • Current Weather: Winds ExS, Beaufort Force 4
  • Usually my favorite assignment while on deck watch is lookout. I love standing at the bow, riding the waves and keeping a weather eye on the horizon for the lights of other ships. I've grown accustomed to seeing 360° of the horizon around me. Occasionally I'll glance at the starry sky and recognize Cassiopeia, Taurus, Orion, and others – constellations I've learned while out at sea. I also use this time for self-reflection and singing; lately Christmas hymns have been the songs of choice.

    But the other night I must say that manning the helm in 10 foot swells was epic. The Corwith Cramer was bounding through the waves fighting to stay on course as we all waited for the winds to shift and the swells to subside. Those sleeping below deck may not have enjoyed the rough conditions, but for me it was an adrenaline rush.

    Today, thankfully, the winds have shifted and we are on course to travel through the Yucatan Channel within the next day. It was sunny and warm on deck, though on night watch we wear pants, hats, and jackets in defense of the "cold" (i.e. the low 70s). I'm heading to my bunk for some sleep before my 0230 wakeup. --Stephanie

Dec

15

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 18 35 N x 83 14W
  • Current Weather: Winds NE Force 4 Steering 315 True
  • Sometimes in the world of sailing you have to go south in order to sail north. That's exactly what the Corwith Cramer has done over the last several days, as northerly winds from a series of cold fronts pushed into the Caribbean, disrupting the trade winds and blowing the ship back to the southeast as we hove to and waited for things to improve. Yesterday morning our hopes were realized as the wind shifted enough for us to resume our westerly course towards the Yucatan Channel and Gulf of Mexico. Viewed on the chart, our track over this period of back-and forth forms an almost perfect triangle, 40 miles on a side, and bearing an uncanny resemblance to a Christmas tree.

    Capt. Elliot Rappaport

Dec

14

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 18° 06'N x 081° 40'W, 8 kts, 283°T.
  • Current Weather: NxE wind, Beaufort Force 6, 8 ft seas, and 8/8 cloud cover.
  • During the past two weeks we've traveled 1200 miles across the Caribbean and logged 37 oceanographic sampling stations. Pteropods are counted, Myctophids are dissected, Rosalind Bank sediments are sieved, and nutrient samples are processed. Now, we begin in earnest the analysis and interpretation of the data. The main salon turns into a study lounge between meals. No one seems thwarted by the gimbaled tables swaying as they type. Research results will be presented in a poster session at the end of the week and final manuscripts will be submitted over the weekend.

Dec

13

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 18°19'N x 80°39'W
  • Current Weather:
  • A 134-foot ship riding the waves, through the troughs and up the peaks, is an impressive sensation no matter which part of the ship you're on. However, riding those swells while standing out on the net that surrounds the bowsprit and hauling on a flapping sail is something entirely different. Yes, we're clipped in, yes it's safe, but the feeling of your toes gripping through their sandals, the wind and the swells and occasionally sea spray gets the adrenaline pumping like none other.

    Several of us got to experience this today as we were striking the jib, preparing to heave-to in order to wait out unfavorable winds. As we've learned during several of our weather lessons, the cold front that has recently overtaken us brings us northwest winds and steep seas-not ideal when trying to head in that direction. We were spared from the rain that was sure to have brought out the foul weather gear, but two days without much sail handling has started to have its effects on the crew, and many off duty volunteers jumped at the opportunity to set the main and strike the jib. Myself included.

    Tonight we are hove to under a beautiful waxing gibbous moon. I assure you that between looking at constellations in the sky and checking freezer temperatures in dry stores, I stare at that bowsprit hoping that another chance to climb out there comes soon. 13 days 'til Boxing Day! --Julia McCarrier, Deckhand, bowsprit enthusiast.

Dec

12

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: # 18° 17'N x 081° 09'W, 5 kts, 013°T.
  • Current Weather: Wind from the NW, Beaufort Force 3, 3 ft seas.
  • Daily Report:
    When I woke up this morning, I was far more rested than I have been since our trip began. I came up for watch to find endless puffy clouds, a calm sea, and not much to do. You see, I was shipped with the Cramer as a science teaching assistant, to aid in deployments, sample analysis, and student projects. I was very busy in the beginning handling nets, doing hourly data collection, and reviewing procedures with students, but over the past week, an increasing proportion of these tasks has been handled quite adeptly by the students themselves. While I would rather be busy than idle, I enjoy watching the lab operate smoothly with less and less instruction from the professional crew. Our "field day" today showed more of this trend, as the ship was scrubbed head to toe in seemingly record time. And now as the puce fades to purple and grey, and one more day is logged, you can feel the confidence and competence growing in our little community, probably leading to better sleep for everyone. Hello to all of my loved ones, spread far and wide. The Caribbean is beautiful and I wish you could share it with us. --Eric Ettner

Dec

11

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 17° 00’N x 080° 10’W, 5 kts, 310°T.
  • Current Weather: Wind from the NE, Beaufort Force 3, 6 ft seas.
  • Daily Report:
    A northern destination combined with a northerly breeze required us to begin motor sailing for the first time this cruise. Boo. This morning we struck the main and jib, fired up the engine and started our upwind plod to the Yucatan Strait. Not to worry though, seems like C232 is a class full of salty sailors, we won’t let a little choppiness ruin our seasick-less record! On the upside, today was sunny and beautiful and many of us took the opportunity to hang out on the "elephant table", a platform built over the science winch piled high with folded sails and canvas covers; it makes a marvelous spot to relax when we’re off watch. We’ll sit up there for hours, reading and talking in the sun. It’s without doubt my favorite spot on the ship. Right now, we’re all excited for our dinner of fresh Caribbean seafood courtesy of our Honduran exchange yesterday! We also caught a big Mahi on our own line, so Ryan and Lil are dressed up like hibachi chefs and are hard at work rolling sushi in the galley! Shout outs: More beijinhos to the fam and Austin! -- Tori

Dec

10

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: Winds NxE, Beaufort force of 5; Seas 4-6 feet.
  • Current Weather: Over Rosalind Bank with depths as shallow as 20 meters.
  • Daily Report:
    Today we crossed over Rosalind Bank to partake in a science sampling frenzy. Our new toy for the day was the shipek grab-"the bear trap of the sea". The name of the game is to quite literally slam the shipek into the seafloor and stop the wire just after it grabs your sediment sample. Travel time between sites was a mad rush of sail handling. It might just be me, but I find hauling on lines extremely satisfying, and furling or setting sail always leaves me with a smile on my face.

    All I heard was "Kim" and "Spanish", and saw Justin, the first mate, pointing over the starboard side of the ship. I looked down and couldn't help exclaiming in surprise. There were two men in a small canoe, out here in the middle of the ocean. I didn't know what to think, and found many terrible refugee scenarios flashing through my head. My heart sank. I did NOT want to be the one to turn them away to the misery they came from.

    I talked to them for a bit and found they were conch fishermen from a nearby vessel, and only wanted to sell us seafood. Of course! Now I saw the fishing gear, fish, colorful crustaceans, and the bags of conch. We got ourselves some fresh caught conch, a large spider crab of some sort, and they threw in a lobster tail for me. We also gave them other goodies such as drinking water, chocolate, and waffles leftover from breakfast.

    I'm glad I got to talk to these men. Here I was, worrying about how much tanner or stronger I've become, or when the next time I'll get out on the bowsprit is... while they were earning their living in an open boat more than 100 nautical miles away from their home country of Honduras. I don't know what they thought about us, or if they'll care to remember us once the chocolate is gone. I do know that I won't be able to shake the image of these two men in tattered clothes and sun-browned skin looking up at me from their canoe. Go back one generation and I might have been in their situation. Instead I'm on one of the most amazing sailing vessels I've ever seen, following my dreams in marine science. I am much better off than millions of people. This visit in the middle of the Caribbean Sea serves us all as a reminder of just how lucky we are.

    All my love to my mom, dad, and Grace, the BC Annex, and Jen (don't worry, I'll enjoy that lobster tail). -Kimberly Gonzalez

Dec

09

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 150 nautical miles southwest of Jamaica and 220nm northeast of Cabo Gracias a Dios, Honduras.
  • Current Weather: Wind from north 20 knots, 5-8 foot wind swell, skies clear.
  • Daily Report:
    A mighty wind blows straight from the north! An upwind beat to Jamaica's Pedro Bank would not have been easy on the Cramer and her crew, so we have shifted our shallow water sampling station to Honduras's Rosalind Bank.

    Shooting stars early, Southern Cross around 4am, waxing crescent at 5, and Sun at 6:30. Tucker Trawls in the morning. Deck practical skills test in the afternoon. Sailed close-hauled most of the day to maintain the same latitude as Rosalind Bank. Haircuts on the leeward rail now common. Another incredible sunset. Another fantastic dinner by our stewards, Mexi-night! Over the shallows tomorrow is our best chance of trip to hook up some fish .

    Sending along a photo of CC Book Club in our cozy main salon, a favorite haven from that "cold" (high 60's) north breeze. --Ryan

Dec

08

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 16° 24'N x 079° 17'W, 6 kts, 280°T.
  • Current Weather: Winds from the N, Beaufort Force 4, 4-6 ft Seas, 1/8 Cloud Cover
  • Daily Report:
    Cleared to go aloft! After my second trip up the shrouds of the foremast to what is called the fighting top, I have come to the conclusion that climbing 75 feet above the deck and 90 feet above the water with no land or other ships in sight around you is one of the most transcendental experiences. The people on deck below seem almost model-sized as they read a book, man the helm, play an instrument, or conduct experiments in the lab. And as I look out over the water - with a hopeful heart of trying to catch sight of a whale - I remind myself that although time may seem to stand still here, on land it continues to rush by; though, occasionally we do have our reminders of the outside world when we get the score of the latest ball game over the radio or someone writes "16 shopping days left" on the white board in the galley.

    We're also reminded of how quickly time flies when we realize we only have about a week left for scientific sampling until we reach Cuban waters. Some projects are fully underway putting the tucker trawls, neuston tows, and CTD deployments we do at least twice daily to good use, and some of us are still waiting, hoping that what we need will appear and soon. But as I watch the beautiful sun set over the Caribbean, thinking about family and friends back home, I'm pulled back from my musings by the thought that I have to get down before the sun fully sets. Anyways, the dinner bell is about to ring and then I'm on evening watch, so I guess I'd better go. - Stephanie

Dec

07

SSV Robert C. Seamans S232 - Oceans & Climate

SSV Robert C. Seamans S232 - Oceans & Climate
  • Current Position: 16°17.7'N x 77°40.8'W, 5 kts, 315° T
  • Current Weather: Winds NE, Force 3. Seas ENE, 4-5 ft. 2/8 Cloud Coverage
  • Daily Report:
    Greetings from the Assistant Steward! (I must be doing something right if they're letting me blog). We've been underway for 9 days now and all of the students are well adjusted to life at sea and confident in their sail handling. Today we conducted a Man Overboard Drill during class in which we had to efficiently strike the jib and gybe in order to launch the rescue boat and turn back to retrieve the life ring we deployed. We successfully completed the drill and then enjoyed some delicious snacks! In the world of science, we deployed our first Secchi disk yesterday. The circular white disk is attached to the hydrowire and lowered into the water until it can no longer be seen. The depth at which it is not visible from deck equals the level at which 18% of light is still available. Now you may wonder; who determines when the disk is no longer visible? Well we all do of course! Seven of us lined up along the rail on the science deck and watched as the disk descended into the great abyss of the Caribbean Sea. We all yelled "SIGHT" repeatedly until it disappeared (39 meters!). I caught myself on the verge of yelling "DEB!" by accident on more than one occasion (There's your shout-out C-231). -- Shelby

Dec

06

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 15° 45.50'N x 75° 55.45'W, 5 kts, 320° T
  • Current Weather: Winds NNE, Beaufort Force 4, Seas NE, 4-5 ft. 3/8 Cloud Cover
  • Daily Report:
    The mains'l is up! After surfing downwind for a few days we're heading up, trimming in and sailing fast toward the horizon. Now that we're out of Haitian waters we've once again fired up the lab and all its fancy doo-dads. I really did miss the constant, high-pitch chirp of sub-bottom profiler terribly; welcome back Chirpii. We also recently learned the value of gimbaled dinner tables (for you land-lubbers, these are tables that rock with the boat, so nothing falls off...well...that's what they're supposed to do anyway) when some renegade lasagna, cranberry juice and all manners of cutlery took flight yesterday evening. This morning we all saw something a bit more fantastical than flying food; a little tropical squall moved over the ship just after the sun had slid over the horizon, setting the rain aglow with hazy, gold light. And as if that wasn't beautiful enough, two rainbows materialized in the haze, seeming to end just a couple of boat-lengths away. It was just one of those things you stop and stare at for a bit. The Caribbean Sea has an uncanny ability to leave one staring off into the distance wistfully. Which, I must say, doesn't mix well with its other specialty: sending Bostonians stumbling and decorating us with complimentary bruises. Gotta love sailing.

    Shout-outs: Beijinhos to my Familia and Austin! Also, happy birthday to Sarge's dad, she sends her love. --Tori

Dec

05

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 15°08.8' N x 074° 24.5' W, 4.7 kts 280° T
  • Current Weather: Winds ENE, Beaufort Force 5, Seas ENE 6-8 ft; 1/8 cloud cover
  • Daily Report:
    First of all, to be clear: Dolphins + Bioluminescent Phytoplankton = Dolphin Rockets. There's only one thing more exciting than dolphin rockets, and that is the art of winkling. To begin winkling you start by appeasing the Winkling Gods. This is usually done by donning colorful, elaborate headdresses. In front of the picture of Seinfeld's Cosmo Kramer, lies the winkling apparatus. Scientifically, winkling is a chemical titration process that determines the amount of dissolved oxygen in a sample of sea water. It is a tedious procedure but rewarding if you can achieve precision. Today, we crossed into Haitian waters where we did not have clearance to perform scientific sampling, leaving us with only the samples already on board. Therefore, the winkling process was occurring nonstop for almost 24 hours. The winkling Gods are pleased.

    When we are not winkling in lab watch, we often find ourselves out on deck watch in the middle of the night avoiding kamikaze flying fish. To date, two rogue flying fish have landed on our deck. Despite modern navigational electronics, we are still required to post a lookout at the bow, keeping watch for nearby ships or approaching weather.

    After many bow watches, we've composed a list of things we find our minds wandering to on those late nights:

    Existence
    Dream wedding
    Bears
    Song lyrics
    Standing
    Wizardry
    Knots
    Dolphin rockets
    Elliot's hand-drawn diagrams
    What to do with all my shooting star wishes

    - Aaron, Devon, and Wylie

Dec

04

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 15° 08.9'N x 073° 04.1W, 5.8 kts, 277 T
  • Current Weather: Winds ENE, Beaufort Force 5; 3-ft seas ExN; 2/8 cloud cover.
  • Daily Report:
    The past two of days have been extremely busy in lab. We deployed six tucker trawls (a net that allows us to tow at a specific depth), regular noon and midnight neuston tows (see photo!), and CTD casts to measure salinity and temperature at depth. As sampling gets going and research projects begin to take shape, students have been busy refining their methods and collecting data. Along the way, we came across a number of exciting critters, including: pyrosomes, leptocephali (transparent eel larvae), Janthina janithina ("bubble-wrap snails"), several kinds of juvenile fish, and a phronemid amphipod (the inspiration for the Alien movies). In life outside the lab, we had our first field day today! Every nook and cranny of Cramer received a through cleaning while we enjoyed music and candy. Now the stars are out, midwatch is preparing to take the deck, and our research plan will continue with a midnight neuston tow. -Annie (3rd Assistant Scientist)

Dec

03

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 15°59.1'N x 71°49.1'W, Force 3, 271 T.
  • Current Weather: Winds from ESE, 3 ft seas, sunny and hot all day.
  • Daily Report:
    To test our newly acquired sailing skills, we had a line chase between the three watches. This was a relay in which a card indicating the name of a line was given to a member of each team. The line had to be located with only guiding shouts of "warmer" and "colder" from the rest of the team. While B watch dominated early in the competition, we were finally overtaken by A watch in double overtime.

    In other news, B watch has been deemed "Dolphin Watch", as yet again a pod of dolphins came to play in the waves off of our bowsprit both last night and again this afternoon. In lab last night, we derived the following equation: Dolphins + Bioluminescent phytoplankton = Awesome! -Cristina

Dec

02

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 16°08' N x 70°31'W, 4 kts, 290 T.
  • Current Weather: Wind from ENE/E, Beaufort Force 4, 3-5 ft seas, Sunny all day.
  • Daily Report:
    "As the moisturized, sensitive skin of our hands is eroded to reveal the salty sailor's calluses that were held prisoner below, we abandon our attachments to solid ground. The concept of a day is lost in a world ruled by Poseidon's relentless grasp. He does not rest, and neither do we. As we wield the power of the helm, our eyes deviate to the horizon, searching in vain for the ever elusive green flash."

    But seriously, we've begun to get into the swing of things here on the Cramer. Today our watch showed that we are comfortable setting sails and handling lines. Steering gets easier by the day, and scientific deployments are no longer so daunting. Class presentations covered the light-refracting phenomenon that takes place during sunset known as the green flash. 45 seconds of excitement erupted when we passed by a drifting tree and momentarily caught a mahi mahi before it made its way off our fishing line. Our free time is spent reading or sunbathing on deck, keeping our minds off the scarcity of showers.

    Shout out to our land-locked friends and family, -C Watch (Aaron, Devon, Kim, Wylie)

Dec

01

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 16° 57'N x 069° 08'W, 5 kts, 262°T.
  • Current Weather:
  • Daily Report:
    Wind from the ENE/E, Beaufort Force 5, 4-6 ft seas, occasional rain showers. The crew of the Corwith Cramer had their day punctuated by two small pods of dolphins, one right before breakfast and the other just after lunch. Students and staff were alerted by the joyous shouts of "DOLPHINS!" which garnered more attention than the meal bell. Everyone lined both the port and starboard sides to catch a glimpse of these charismatic megafauna. In addition to the wild life, students were given another surprise with an order to set the tops'l-the first time this trip. Shooting stars continue to punctuate the night sky, as everyone on deck crosses their fingers in hopes of avoiding rain.

Nov

30

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 17 18 N x 67 17 W Course: 250 True Speed: 6 knots
  • Current Weather:
  • Daily Report:
    Today marked the end of our first full day at sea, and all hands have done a fantastic job of adapting to their new surroundings. Drills and orientation have given way to actual ship operations, with data streaming into the lab, sails going up and down, and a steady supply of great food from the galley. Moderate trade winds from the northeast continue, providing perfect conditions for our transit to the west, and at night the southern constellations fill the sky with an array of objects that are unfamiliar to many in this boatload of Bostonians.

Nov

29

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: 17° 49.2'N x 064° 57.8'W, 7 kts, 240°T.
  • Current Weather: Wind from the NE, Beaufort Force 5, 4-5 ft seas, and 3/8 cloud cover.
  • Daily Report:
    We departed St. Croix at 1330, thus beginning our 23 day passage across the northern Caribbean bound for Key West. As we exited the channel, we shut down the main engine and set the stays'ls, storm trys'l (instead of the much larger mains'l), and the jib. We're sailing! Spirits are high and so far stomachs are strong!

Nov

28

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program

SSV Corwith Cramer C232 - Boston University Marine Program
  • Current Position: Alongside, Gallows Bay, St. Croix, USVI.
  • Current Weather: Steady moderate Trade Wind conditions.
  • Daily Report:
    Class C232 joined the ship at 1600 this afternoon; orientation started shortly thereafter. Tonight the students were introduced to line handling, safety below decks, and the chart room. Tomorrow morning, we'll remain alongside while we cover lab safety and conduct emergency drills. There is a steep but manageable learning curve during these first 24 hours.