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About SEA

Press Kit

Sea Education Association (SEA) is a leading non-profit, independent educational institution focused on environmental studies and the world’s oceans.

  • Founded 45 years ago (in 1971)
  • Based in the oceanographic research community of Woods Hole, Massachusetts on Cape Cod
  • One of six scientific research institutions in this vicinity
  • Full-time faculty in oceanography, history, anthropology, public policy, and nautical science
  • Dedicated to educating the next generation of ocean scholars, stewards, and leaders

SEA Semester is our flagship academic study abroad program.



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SEA in the News

Below are highlights from recent news articles featuring SEA Semester. To view more, click here.

SEA supports UN planning for Phoenix Islands Protected Area

Posted on: June 14, 2017
By: Paul Joyce, Dean
SEA Semester

Last week, SEA joined in committing to advance science and partnership in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area.

At the UN Ocean Conference, held June 5th through 9th, the PIPA Scientific Advisory Committee made a voluntary commitment to implement UN Sustainable Development Goal 14, to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development”, with support from SEA and other collaborating organizations*.

Specifically, this commitment includes generating a new ten-year research plan for the Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA), one of the largest marine protected areas and the largest—and deepest—UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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On World Oceans Day, a rising tide of optimism

Posted on: June 08, 2017
By: Dr. Jeff Wescott, Sea Education Association
SEA Semester

How often do you think about the ocean? As inhabitants of a coastal commonwealth and a historic maritime city, we do so perhaps more than the average American. The more compelling question is “how do we think about the ocean?” How would we describe it? Beautiful and mysterious? Likely. Awe-inspiring? Perhaps. How about imperiled? Damaged? Hopeless?

Thursday, June 8 marks the 26th annual World Oceans Day, an idea that emerged from the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The World Oceans Day website describes the annual event as providing “a unique opportunity to honor, help protect, and conserve the world’s oceans.” It notes that our oceans provide much of the oxygen we breathe and the food we eat, and help to maintain the climate that sustains us. Our oceans also inspire us. For one day in June, we are encouraged to acknowledge and celebrate these gifts, and to commit ourselves to improving ocean health through both activism and our choices as consumers.

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8 Things You Can Do for World Oceans Day!

Posted on: June 08, 2017
By: Jessica Donohue, SEA Research Assistant
SEA Semester

This World Oceans Day, the focus is on encouraging solutions to plastic pollution, and preventing marine litter.

At SEA, we’ve been studying plastic pollution for a long time. The plastic we study is collected in our neuston nets floating at the surface of the open ocean.  Mostly, we find microplastics (pieces less than 5mm in diameter, usually broken down from larger objects).

It’s a serious problem, impacting marine life and degrading marine environments.

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SEA grad Mike Gil selected as a TED Fellow

Posted on: May 24, 2017
By: Doug Karlson, communications@sea.edu
SEA Semester

Congratulations to SEA alum and marine biologist Mike Gil for being selected as a TED Fellow. He’ll join a class of 21 change-makers from around the world to deliver a talk this August from the TEDGlobal stage in Arusha, Tanzania.

A National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of California, Davis, Mike studies human impact on marine ecosystems, and how social interactions among fish that eat harmful algae can counteract coral reef degradation.

As a science communicator, Mike started a science appreciation campaign. He creates videos and gives talks which he says are designed to “reveal the lesser-known side of science: an adventure, accessible to all….”

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Contact Us

Email: communications@sea.edu